The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: Memories of the Future

The last two months have been a period of tit-for-tat in the PC video card industry. Both AMD and NVIDIA have been going back and forth, making announcements and launching products as part of a broader restructuring of the mid-range and high-end video card markets in response to the launch of AMD’s Radeon RX 5700 series of video cards. Performance is going up while last-minute maneuvering has brought prices slightly down, all the while the two major players in the GPU space look to solidify their product lineups and secure their competitive edge against their competition.

For all practical purposes, NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 20 Super series has been the company’s response to AMD’s new video cards. A combination of a mid-generation kicker and a product stack realignment to go head-to-head with AMD, the Super cards have given NVIDIA’s product lineup a modest performance boost at almost every level. After launching the first two cards in this sub-series early this month with the GeForce RTX 2070 Super and GeForce RTX 2060 Super, NVIDIA is back again to launch the last (?) of the Super cards: the previously announced GeForce RTX 2080 Super.



Source: AnandTech – The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: Memories of the Future

The Kingston KC2000 SSD Review: Bringing BiCS4 To Retail

The Kingston KC2000 is a new high-end consumer M.2 NVMe SSD. Kingston had been neglecting this market segment for a while, but the two year old KC1000 has finally been replaced by a proper successor using the latest flash memory and controllers..The company’s latest flagship consumer SSD is a better contender than they’ve had in a long time, but despite its use of the latest 96-layer 3D NAND it comes up short when compared to more reasonably priced drives that are still using 64-layer NAND.



Source: AnandTech – The Kingston KC2000 SSD Review: Bringing BiCS4 To Retail

ASUS Announces New ROG Phone II: 120Hz OLED, 6000mAh & Snapdragon 855+

Today ASUS is releasing the successor to last year’s enthusiast-level gaming phone – the ROG Phone. This year’s model features the same DNA that the original model was built on- but this time around ASUS went for bigger and better in every regard, upgrading the new ROG Phone II with some new impressive hardware, creating quite a beast of a phone.


ASUS’s rationale for releasing a gaming-focused phone is that the mobile market is seeing some exceptional annual growth, with mobile accounting for 47% of the total gaming market world-wide, with a healthy growth of 12.8% for mobile and specifically a 14.2% year-on-year growth for smartphone gaming. As such, ASUS sees a large opportunity to carve out a niche in the market in terms of offering a phone that maxes out the mobile gaming experience.




























ASUS ROG Phones
  ROG Phone ROG Phone II
SoC Snapdragon 845 (OC)

4x Cortex-A75 @ 2.96GHz

4x Cortex-A55 @ 1.80GHz


Adreno 630 @ MHz

Qualcomm Snapdragon 855+ 
1x Cortex-A76 @ 2.96GHz

3x Cortex-A76 @ 2.42GHz

4x Cortex-A55 @ 1.80GHz

Adreno 640 @ 675MHz

DRAM 8 GB LPDDR4X 12 GB LPDDR4X
Storage 128 / 512GB UFS 2.1 <= 512GB UFS 3.0
Display 6.0″ AMOLED

2160 x 1080 (18:9)

90Hz


 

6.59″ AMOLED

2340 x 1080 (19.5:9)

120Hz


240Hz Touch

Size Height 158.8 mm 170.99 mm
Width 76.2 mm 77.6 mm
Depth 8.6 mm 9.48 mm
Weight 200 grams 240 grams
Battery Capacity 4000mAh 6000mAh
Wireless Charging
Rear Cameras
Main 12MP 48MP IMX586

0.8µm pixels (1.6µm 4:1 12MP)
Telephoto
Wide 8MP

120° wide-angle
13MP

125° wide-angle
Extra
Front Camera 8MP 24MP
I/O USB-C 3.1

3.5mm headphone

Wireless (local) 802.11ac Wave 2 Wi-Fi

Bluetooth 5.0 LE + NFC

802.11ad (Wireless display)

   
Other Features Dual Stereo Speakers
Dual-SIM Dual nanoSIM
Colours    
Launch Price 128GB $899   ????
512GB $1099 512GB ????

At the heart of the new ROG Phone II is the Snapdragon 855. But this isn’t your regular S855 we’ve seen from other flagships so far this year, but rather a new SKU bin called the Snapdragon 855+. The new variant upgrades the clocks on the CPU and particularly on the GPU. On the CPU side we’re seeing the Prime core being overclocked from 2.84GHz to 2.96GHz, giving a 4% boost in some single-threaded applications, whilst the new GPU sees a larger 15% performance boost being upgraded from 585MHz to 675MHz.



Whilst the new increased GPU performance of the chip brings a new healthy upgrade to the experience, what really makes the new ROG Phone II differ from other devices is ASUS’ new improved thermal dissipation capabilities as well as its sustained performance claims. The company claims that the phone is able to maintain its peak performance significantly better than other smartphones, suffering much less degradations from thermal throttling.


Other internal hardware upgrades includes the upgrade from 8GB LPDDR4X in the original to now 12GB in the ROG Phone II.


ASUS also follows other vendors in terms of adopting the new UFS 3.0 storage standard which promises to double the theoretical peak transfer rates. The ROG Phone II still maintains a maximum of 512GB of storage in this regard.



Source: Android Central


What’s most impressive about the new device though is its sheer size. This is now a much bigger phone than last year’s original, raising the screen diameter from 6.0” to 6.59”. Although some of the increased diameter is due to the stretching of the aspect ratio from 18:9 to 19.5:9, the overall phone still is much bigger as it gains 12.19mm in height to 170.99mm, 1.4mm in width to 77.6mm and is now 10% thicker at 9.48mm.


The thickness is especially interesting as the new phone now houses a whopping 50% bigger battery, which now reaches 6000mAh. The physical aspect where this is most noticeable in the phone is in its weight which grows from 200g to 240g, marking the new ROG Phone II as quite the heavy unit.


The vastly increased battery capacity is an important feature of the phone as it allows for significantly longer gaming sessions and ASUS promises the phone to last much longer than competing devices when playing high-end games.



Source: Android Central


Of course the new size isn’t the only upgraded aspect of the new screen: ASUS continues to use an AMOLED display, but now further pushes the boundaries in terms of refresh rate by going from 90Hz in the original to a new 120Hz panel. The resolution still remains 1080p with the only upgrade being a few more pixels to fit the stretched the elongated aspect ratio. At this size the resolution might not be the sharpest amongst the competition, but for a gaming-centric smartphone it’ll still provide excellent performance in essentially any games currently available.



ASUS has also improved the touch aspects of the phone: As far as I’m aware, this is the first ever 240Hz touch controller in a smartphone. What this has allowed ASUS to do is vastly improve the touch latency compared to any other smartphone by significant margins, which together with the new 120Hz display panel should result in some excellent fluidity and smoothness.


On the camera side of things, the ROG Phone II seems to adopt the Zenfone 6’s setup which includes the Sony IMX586 48MP camera sensor module as well as a 13MP wide-angle camera. ASUS hasn’t gone into details of the camera but we largely expect it to match the performance of its sibling device. The front camera has also been upgraded from 8MP to 25MP.



Much like on the original ROG Phone, ASUS will be offering a slew of different accessories for the new ROG Phone II. The phone itself comes with an additional connector on the side of the device to which the accessories can connect to, offering similar features and additions as last year’s line-up.


The ROG Phone II launches in China on July 23rd with a glossy back, whilst the worldwide variant will be available in the first week of September in a matte black back. No pricing available as of yet.


Device images courtesy of Android Central



Source: AnandTech – ASUS Announces New ROG Phone II: 120Hz OLED, 6000mAh & Snapdragon 855+

AMD Joins CXL Consortium: Playing in All The Interconnects

AMD’s CTO, Mark Papermaster, has published a blog post this week said that AMD has joined the Compute Express Link (CXL) Consortium. The industry group is led by a set of nine industry giants such as Intel, Alibaba, Google, and Microsoft. The CXL 1.0 technology uses the PCIe 5.0 physical infrastructure to enable a coherent low-latency interconnect protocol that allows to share CPU and non-CPU resources efficiently and without using complex memory management. The announcement indicates that AMD now supports all of the current and upcoming high-speed interconnect protocols, including CCIX, Gen-Z, and OpenCAPI.



Source: AnandTech – AMD Joins CXL Consortium: Playing in All The Interconnects

Western Digital Unveils IntelliFlash N5100: An Entry-Level All-Flash Storage System

Western Digital has introduced its most affordable NVMe all-flash storage array, the new IntelliFlash N5100. The device offers up to 92 TB of raw NAND flash using SN200 NVMe SSDs, and can be further expanded when needed using additional 2U IntelliFlash SAS modules featuring 24 SAS drive bays, offering hundreds of terabytes of raw NAND flash. The IntelliFlash N5100 is aimed at customers who need to accelerate business applications, but who do not need extreme levels of performance at high prices.


Western Digital’s IntelliFlash N-series NVMe all-flash arrays sit above the company’s IntelliFlash HD-series all-flash and T-series hybrid-flash offering the lowest latency of around 200 µsec and the highest data transfer rates. The N-series family contains three types of arrays: the highest-end N5800, the mainstream N5200, and now the entry-level N5100. The top-of-the-range N5800 offers up to 1.7M sustained IOPS and up to 23 GB/s data throughput, the midrange N5200 provides up to 800K IOPS, whereas the entry-level N5100 features up to 400K sustained IOPS.








Western Digital’s IntelliFlash N-series
  N5100 N5200 N5800
Random Read/Write Performance 400K IOPS 800K IOPS 1.7M IOPS
Sustained Data Transfer Rate ? ? 23 GB/s
Latency 200 µsec 200 µsec 200 µsec
Maximum RAW Capacity 400 TB 1.4 PB 2.5 PB

All the Western Digital IntelliFlash N-series all-flash arrays are based on Intel’s Xeon processors, and use WD’s dual-active controller architecture in a 2U form-factor. The N5100-series AFAs can be expanded using 2U SAS-based HD-series AFAs that carry SSDs with up to 15.36 TB capacity (Ultrastar DC SS530) and providing up to 368 TB of raw NAND flash (in case of the HD2160 version) as well as 1 ms latency. Meanwhile, the IntelliFlash N5800 can support multiple IntelliFlash HD or 2U or 3U machines for a total raw NAND capacity of up to 2.5 PB.



From software standpoint, all the latest IntelliFlash machines run Western Digital’s IntelliFlash OE 3.10 operating system that supports block (FC, iSCSI) as well as file (NFS, CIFS, SMBv3) protocols and therefore are compatible with a variety of software from multiple vendors. Furthermore, the OS fully supports virtualization, data protection, data reduction, inline deduplication, and compression to improve performance, reliability, and increase effective capacity.



Interestingly, the IntelliFlash OE 3.10 adds support for Storage Class Memory as well as NVDIMMs to further boost their performance, but Western Digital does not disclose what kind of SCE and NVDIMMs are currently supported or which future configurations will be supported.


Western Digital’s IntelliFlash N5100 AFAs will be available in the near future. Actual pricing will depend on exact configurations.



Related Reading:


Source: Western Digital



Source: AnandTech – Western Digital Unveils IntelliFlash N5100: An Entry-Level All-Flash Storage System

Corsair Unveils 32 GB Vengeance LPX DDR4 DIMMs, 64 GB & 128 GB Dual-Channel Kits

Corsair has introduced its first 32 GB unbuffered DRAM modules along with 64 GB and 128 GB dual-channel memory kits for mainstream PC platforms based on AMD’s 400/500-series as well as Intel’s 300-series chipsets (and their successors). Besides, the company also unveiled its 256GB eight-channel kit for high-end desktop as well as extreme workstation processors.


Corsair’s Vengeance LPX DDR4 unbuffered memory modules are based on 16 Gb memory chips (from an unconfirmed vendor, though Corsair historically relies on devices from Samsung) as well as the company’s custom 10-layer PCB designed to ensure quality signaling when operating at higher clocks. Traditionally for this product family, Corsair’s 32 GB Vengeance LPX UDIMMs are equipped with black anodized aluminum heat spreaders.



Set to be available in kits containing one, two, four, or eight 32 GB unbuffered DIMMs, Corsair’s Vengeance LPX modules are rated for DDR4-2400 CL16 16-16-39 at 1.2 V, DDR4-2666 CL16 18-18-35 at 1.2 V, and DDR4-3000 CL16 20-20-38 at 1.35 V modes. It is noteworthy that the modules come with SPD programmed for DDR4-2133 CL15 mode, but since they feature XMP 2.0 profiles, setting correct speeds should be easy.














Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 Kits Featuring 32 GB UDIMMs
Data rate Latency Kit Capacity Modules Voltage Heat Spreader Launch Price
2400 MT/s CL16

16-16-39
32 GB 1 × 32 GB 1.2 V Black $149.99
64 GB 2 × 32 GB $299.99
128 GB 4 × 32 GB $599.99
256 GB 8 × 32 GB $1,199.99
2666 MT/s CL16 18-18-35 32 GB 1 × 32 GB 1.2 V $154.99
64 GB 2 × 32 GB $304.99
128 GB 4 × 32 GB $609.99
256 GB 8 × 32 GB ?
3000 MT/s CL16 20-20-38 32 GB 1 × 32 GB 1.35 V ?
64 GB 2 × 32 GB ?

Corsair’s 32 GB Vengeance LPX DDR4 unbuffered memory modules as well as kits on their base are available today directly from Corsair and will shortly be available from the company’s partners. One 32 GB DDR4-2400/DDR4-2666 module is priced at $149.99/$154.99; but dual, quad, and eight-channel kits are naturally more expensive.


Related Reading:


Source: Corsair



Source: AnandTech – Corsair Unveils 32 GB Vengeance LPX DDR4 DIMMs, 64 GB & 128 GB Dual-Channel Kits

Patriot Launches P200 SSDs with Maxio and Silicon Motion Controllers: From $31.99

Patriot has introduced its new family of entry-level SATA SSDs offering capacities from 256 GB to 2 TB. The P200-series drives use controllers from Maxio Technology and Silicon Motion, the first time in years that Patriot uses controllers not from Phison.


Available in a 2.5-inch/7 mm form-factor, the Patriot P200 drives feature 256 GB, 512 GB, and 1 TB configurations and are based on Silicon Motion’s SM2258XT controllers, whereas the top-of-the-line 2 TB model is powered by Maxio Technology’s MAS0902A controller. The drives are powered by 3D NAND memory, but the manufacturer does not disclose exact model of chips or their manufacturer (we do know that SMI and Maxio controllers can work with memory from various vendors though).



As far as performance is concerned, Patriot says that its P200-series SSDs can offer up to 530 MB/s sequential read speeds, up to 460 MB/s sequential write speeds, up to 90K random read IOPS, as well as up to 80K random write speeds. Performance wise, the new drives from Patriot offer similar speed levels as other SATA 6 Gbps SSDs.


When it comes to endurance levels, Patriot’s P200 SSDs can offer 0.45 – 0.58 drive writes per day (DWPD), which is actually higher when compared to 0.3 DWPD offered by cheap 3D QLC NAND-based drives these days.


All Patriot’s P200 SSDs are covered by a three-year warranty and are available now for $31.99$189.99, depending on capacity.





















Patriot’s P200 Specifications
Capacity 256 GB 512 GB 1 TB 2 TB
Model Number P200S256G25 P200S512G25 P200S1TB25 P200S2TB25
Controller Silicon Motion SM2258XT Maxio MAS0902A
NAND Flash 3D NAND
Form-Factor, Interface 2.5-inch/7-mm, SATA 6 Gbps
Sequential Read up to 530 MB/s
Sequential Write up to 460 MB/s
Random Read IOPS up to 90K
Random Write IOPS up to 80K
Pseudo-SLC Caching Supported
DRAM Buffer No
AES Encryption unknown
Power Management Automatic sleep and wake-up mechanism power saving
Warranty 3 years
MTBF 2,000,000 hours
TBW 160 TB 320 TB 640 TB 1000 TB
DWPD 0.57 0.57 0.58 0.45
Price at Launch $31.99 $49.99 $87.99 $189.99


Related Reading:


Source: Patriot



Source: AnandTech – Patriot Launches P200 SSDs with Maxio and Silicon Motion Controllers: From .99

Intel’s Xeon Platinum 8284 CPU: When 300 MHz Cost $5,500

Besides Xeon processors that are officially mentioned on its website and price list, Intel has tens of ‘off roadmap’ server CPUs only available to select customers that have special requests. Recently journalists from ComputerBase discovered that Intel has Xeon Platinum 8284, the company’s fastest 28-core chip for multi-socket servers. The CPU runs 300 MHz faster than the ‘official’ Xeon Platinum 8280, but costs considerably more.



Source: AnandTech – Intel’s Xeon Platinum 8284 CPU: When 300 MHz Cost ,500

Samsung Starts Production of LPDDR5-5500 Devices: 12 GB of DRAM in a Smartphone

Samsung has kicked off volume production of its LPDDR5 memory devices and intends to start mass assembly of memory packages based on the new DRAMs. The company’s LPDDR5 memory will be used for upcoming flagship smartphones with up to 12 GB of memory in the coming months.


Samsung’s 12 Gb LPDDR5 memory devices feature a 5500 MT/s data transfer rate, which is about 30% higher when compared to currently used LPDDR4X-4266 DRAM. One of the first products to use the new 12 Gb LPDDR5 devices will be Samsung’s 12 GB LPDDR5 package featuring a 44 GB/s bandwidth.


The manufacturer produces its 12 Gb LPDDR5 chips using its 2nd Generation 10 nm-class process technology that enables it to make the new chips smaller (i.e., cheaper) and more power efficient, yet Samsung does not disclose exact voltages of these new DRAMs. What we do know is that the ICs feature a variable voltage that is up to 1.1 V. The producer claims that its LPDDR5 devices are 30% more power efficient than existing mobile memory chips because of a new circuit design with enhanced clocking, a new deep sleep mode, as well as low-power feature that guarantees stable operation at high clocks.



Assembly of 12 GB LPDDR5-5500 packages will commence later in July, which indicates that the company expects demand for these products in the coming months. Quite naturally, Samsung does not disclose customers interested in 12 GB of LPDDR5 memory, but there are a number of new flagship smartphone launches scheduled for the coming months, so we are going to find out soon. We do expect that Samsung is starting to build inventory for new 1Q2020 device launches which will have next-generation LP5 compatible SoCs in them as well.


Next year Samsung plans to release 16 Gb LPDDR5 devices and eventually increase data transfer rates of its LPDDR5 DRAMs all the way to 6400 MT/s. Meanwhile, as demand for LPDDR5 increases, Samsung may transfer production of this memory to its massive campus near Pyeongtaek, South Korea.


Related Reading:


Source: Samsung




Source: AnandTech – Samsung Starts Production of LPDDR5-5500 Devices: 12 GB of DRAM in a Smartphone

The MSI MEG X570 Ace Motherboard Review: Ace in the Hole at $369

In our first X570 motherboard review we have the MSI MEG X570 Ace. This motherboard represents MSI’s high-end range and sits in the top 3 of its product stack. The MEG X570 Ace has a black and gold theme which fits in with AMD’s 50 year anniversary, and also includes an ‘Infinity Mirror’ on the rear panel cover. It’s a beefy looking product, and the Ace has a trump card of a price tag of $369 as it offers enthusiast-level features such as a 2.5G Ethernet, a true 12+2-phase power delivery, and three PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots, all at a fairly reasonable price.



Source: AnandTech – The MSI MEG X570 Ace Motherboard Review: Ace in the Hole at 9

European Commission Fines Qualcomm €242m For Anti-trust Violations

Today the European Commission has concluded a 4 year long antitrust investigation into anti-competitive business behaviour of Qualcomm against other players in the market, and has fined the company €242 million for abusing its market dominance in 3G baseband chipsets during the period of 2009 to 2011.


The investigation was formally opened on July 16th 2015 and particularly looked at Qualcomm’s behaviour in the late 3G/UMTS and early 4G era where it held a commanding lead over other vendors in supplying modem chipsets.


The Commission concluded that Qualcomm had engaged in predatory pricing of three chipsets with evidence that the company had aimed to strategically push out and eliminate new contenders in the market, with a specific mention of Icera.


The Commission goes into more detail in regards to Qualcomm’s pricing behaviour in the mid-2009 to mid-2011 period where it concluded that it sold UMTS chipsets below cost to Huawei and ZTE, two important customers, with the goal of eliminating Icera.


Icera was an up-and-coming UMTS and LTE vendor which had started to see success in the market, and ended up being acquired by Nvidia with plans of integrating the technology into the Tegra line-up of SoCs, one product of this venture ending up being the Tegra 4i. The Tegra 4i unfortunately saw very little success among vendors in the market even though the chipset was technically equivalent to the Snapdragon 800/801 SoCs at the time. Nvidia ended up shuttering the division in 2015 due to a lack of success.


Qualcomm has communicated that the company is planning to appeal the finding.


The fine comes shortly after a recent scathing ruling in the US where the FTC had accused the company of similar anti-competitive behaviour breaching antitrust laws, and several years of scrutiny and fines by several regulatory agencies of various countries around the world.


Related Reading:




Source: AnandTech – European Commission Fines Qualcomm €242m For Anti-trust Violations

Toshiba Memory To Rebrand As Kioxia

In 2017, Toshiba was forced to sell off its flash memory business to stave off bankruptcy. The memory business was spun off as Toshiba Memory Corporation and sold for $18 billion to a consortium led by Bain Capital after a high-stakes bidding war. Toshiba Memory has continued to thrive as the number two manufacturer of NAND flash memory and a major player in the SSD market. Toshiba Memory has been laying the groundwork for an IPO that could happen as early as November of this year. Part of that preparation includes establishing a more independent identity form the Toshiba conglomerate that only retained about 40% ownership of the memory business.


To that end, Toshiba Memory will be rebranding as Kioxia at the beginning of October. Toshiba says the new name is a combination of kioku (Japanese for “memory”) and axia (Greek for “value”). The announcement of the new name doesn’t include any strategy shifts, only generic corporate platitudes. On the technology side, it’s still business as usual save for recovering from the effects of a recent power outage at their fabs in Yokkaichi, Japan. On the financial side, details of their plans for an IPO are still largely unofficial and the timing may still be influenced by changing market conditions. When the Bain-led consortium acquired Toshiba Memory in 2017, the original plan was for an IPO to occur within three years, and it looks like they are on track to meet that deadline.


Related Reading:




Source: AnandTech – Toshiba Memory To Rebrand As Kioxia

Club 3D’s CSV-1562 USB Type-C Dock Has Three 4K Display Outputs

Club 3D has announced its new 15-in-1 USB Type-C docking station which has a total of five display outputs that can drive up to three 4K Ultra-HD monitors. The new CSV-1562 uses display output chips from DisplayLink to enable multiple display connectors, which can add unique capabilities to mainstream notebooks without discrete GPUs.


Aimed at mobile professionals who need multiple ports and many displays, the Club 3D CSV-1562 USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C docking station integrates a GbE adapter, five USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A ports, one USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C connector (that can charge mobile phones), five display outputs (three HDMI 2.0 and two DisplayPort 1.2 connectors), a 3.5-mm audio output, and a 3.5-mm microphone input. In addition, the USB-C dock has a built-in PSU and can deliver up to 60 W of power to its host laptop.



The key feature of the Club 3D CSV-1562 is of course its graphics output capabilities enabled by a USB-based DisplayLink controller. Two out of five outputs can drive two 4K60 monitors, another one can drive a 4K30 display. Alternatively, two DisplayPorts can be used to connect a 5K60 monitor. Because we are talking about a DisplayLink-based solution, the CSV-1562 needs appropriate Virtual Graphics Card (VGC) software/drivers that takes the virtual framebuffer, compresses it and sends the data over USB to the company’s proprietary Hardware Rendering Engine (HRE) that converts it to display signals. DisplayLink’s software thus naturally consumes some computer resources and has certain requirements.



Being a unique USB-C docking solution, the Club 3D CSV-1562 is not cheap at all, but if you have a USB-C laptop yet need to run two or three 4K monitors, you do not really have much of a choice. The unit is currently available in Japan for ¥29,800 (so think about MSRP of around $250 in the USA).


Related Reading:


Source: Club 3D (via PC Watch)



Source: AnandTech – Club 3D’s CSV-1562 USB Type-C Dock Has Three 4K Display Outputs

ID Cooling IS-50X Low-Profile SFF Cooler, Rated for 130 W TDP

ID Cooling has introduced its new cooling system designed for small form-factor (SFF) PCs, for CPUs with a TDP rating of up to 130W. The IS-50X has a 120-mm fan and is just 57 mm tall, and is designed for desktops builds featuring higher-end processors from AMD or Intel with six or eight cores that can dissipate a lot of thermal energy.


Traditionally, CPU coolers for smaller systems are designed for mainstream chips have a TDP between 35W to 65W. Since demand for high-performance SFF PCs is on the rise, manufacturers are developing coolers that can handle processors with TDP levels that exceed 95W. Such devices usually feature multiple heat pipes along with more sophisticated fans. For example, the IS-50X comes with five 6-mm heat pipes as well as a 120-mm PWM fan with 13 curved blades that rotates at a speed of 600 – 1600 RPM. The fan can produce airflow of up to 53.6 CFM and has a maximum load noise level of only 30.2 dB(A).



When it comes to compatibility, the ID Cooling IS-50X cooler is compatible with all contemporary platforms from AMD and Intel, including the latest AM4 and LGA1155 sockets.

















The ID Cooling IS-50X Specifications
  IS-50X
CPU TDP 130 W
Material Copper heatpipes aluminum fins
Dimension with Fan 120 mm (W) × 57 mm (H) × 122 mm (D)
Heat Pipes 5 × 6 mm heat pipes
Air Pressure ~ 1.36 mm H2O
Air Flow (CFM)  53.6 CFM
Speed  600 ~ 1600 RPM
Noise 13 ~ 30.2 dBA
Type of Bearing Hydraulic bearing
Life Expectancy ?
Weight 310 grams
Compatibility AMD AM4/FM2+/FM2/FM1/AM3+/AM3/AM2+/AM2
Intel LGA1151/1150/1155/1156

ID Cooling is one a few companies which offers high-performance CPU coolers for SFF PCs. Earlier this year the firm introduced its 30-mm high IS-30 cooler for processors with TDP levels of up to 100 W. The new IS-50X is naturally considerably larger, but it can better handle processors that are either overclocked, or run at higher Turbo clocks when possible.



ID Cooling did not disclose pricing of the IS-50X cooler this week, but its IS-50 unit was available for $33.39 (down from $52.99) from Newegg at press time.




Related Reading:


Source: ID Cooling (via Tom’s Hardware)



Source: AnandTech – ID Cooling IS-50X Low-Profile SFF Cooler, Rated for 130 W TDP

Nintendo Announces New Version of Switch with Longer Battery Life

Nintendo has announced a new version of its Switch game console that features a considerably longer battery life than the first-generation model. The new console likely uses new components that feature a lower power consumption and therefore the gaming device can work for longer durations on one charge.


The new Nintendo Switch console has the same features as the original one (handheld mode, tabletop mode, TV mode, Joy-Con controllers, etc.) and looks exactly the same too. The company does not disclose precise specifications of the unit, but only says it can work for 4.5 – 9 hours on one charge, up from 2.5 – 6.5 hours in case of the previous-gen model.


Since it is hard to increase capacity of a battery by 80% in a short period of time without increasing its physical dimensions, it is more than likely that the product is actually based on a version of NVIDIA’s Tegra X1 SoC made using a more advanced (12 nm or 16 nm) process technology and featuring the same lower power consumption that we reported about a week ago on the new Switch Lite.


Since the new model with better battery life looks the same, it remains to be seen how Nintendo plans to differentiate between the two versions of its Switch consoles from the older ones in terms of hardware packaging. The original version carries the HAC-001 model number (with serial numbers starting from XAW), whereas the new SKUs will feature the HAC-001(01) model number (with serial numbers beginning from XKW).


The new Nintendo Switch game console will carry the same $299.99 MSRP as the original device and will be available in the near future.



Related Reading:


Source: Nintendo, Nintendo Twitter (via Gizmodo)




Source: AnandTech – Nintendo Announces New Version of Switch with Longer Battery Life

HP Launches Z6 G4 Workstation with Intel Xeon Scalable & Quadro RTX 6000

HP has started sales of its fourth-generation Z6 workstation, which pack one or two of Intel’s Xeon Scalable processor, NVIDIA’s Quadro RTX graphics cards, as well as up to 384 GB of memory. The new HP Z6 G4 machine is designed for graphics and compute intensive workloads and is aimed at VFX specialists, engineers and other creative professionals.


HP’s Z6 G4 workstation is based on one Intel Xeon W CPU or two Intel Xeon Scalable processors, with up to 48 cores in total. The machine can integrate up to 384 GB of DDR4 memory with ECC as well as six PCIe add-in-boards. Since the workstation has two PCIe 3.0 x16 slots, it can also feature two NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 graphics cards. In addition, the system can pack multiple SSDs and HDDs that offer tens of terabytes of storage space.


The key feature of HP’s Z6 G4 is its expandability and upgradeability. It may be configured with one Xeon W processor, but may be eventually upgraded to two Xeon Scalable CPUs using a special module. The machine comes with a 1000 W power supply, enough to feed the most power-hungry components.


HP’s Z6 workstations cost starting from $1,829 and sit between the company’s top-of-the-range dual-processor Z8 machine with up to four Quadro RTX 8000 graphics cards (which costs $2,489 and higher) as well as a more compact and affordable Z4 with two graphics cards that starts at $1359.


Like all HP Z workstations, the Z6 G4 comes with the company’s Sure Start self-healing BIOS capability, HP Sure Run security feature, HP Sure Recover  as well as a three-year warranty.


Related Reading:


Source: HP



Source: AnandTech – HP Launches Z6 G4 Workstation with Intel Xeon Scalable & Quadro RTX 6000

Giveaway: Seagate Ironwolf 110 SSD (480GB)

We haven’t yet given away any hardware this summer, so let’s change that. Earlier this year Seagate announced that they’d be expanding their Ironwolf family of NAS-focused drives to include SATA SSDs, and to that end the company has sent over a 480GB drive for us to give away.


As noted by Ganesh earlier this year when the drives launched, the Ironwolf 110 family the recent drop in NAND pricing has opened the door to SSDs becoming increasingly viable for NASes, especially as cache drives. SMBs and SMEs have already been using enterprise SSDs for this purpose, and Seagate believes that there is a market for SSDs specifically targeting the NAS market, as long as it is at the right price point.


With capacities ranging from 240GB to 3.84TB, Seagate is offering a fairly expansive family with the Ironwolf 110. The drives, based on 3D TLC NAND with sustained performance numbers of 560 / 535 MBps sequential reads / writes, support a relatively hearty 1 DWPD endurance, despite the usual read-heavy scenarios that NASes drive.  Fittingly, since SSDs offer higher reliability due to a lack of moving parts, the rated nonrecoverable read errors rate is 1 per 10E17, 2 orders of magnitude better than the typical Ironwolf HDD.














Seagate Ironwolf 110 Series Specifications
Capacity 240 GB 480 GB 960 GB 1920 GB 3840 GB
Form Factor 2.5″ 7mm SATA
NAND Flash 3D TLC
Sequential Read 560 MB/s
Sequential

Write
345 MB/s 535 MB/s
Random Read 55k IOPS 75k IOPS 90k IOPS 90k IOPS 85k IOPS
Random

Write
30k IOPS 50k IOPS 55k IOPS 50k IOPS 45k IOPS
Idle Power 1.2 W
Active Power 2.3 W 2.7 W 3.2 W 3.4 W 3.5 W
Warranty 5 years
Write

Endurance
435 TB

1 DWPD
875 TB

1 DWPD
1750 TB

1 DWPD
3500 TB

1 DWPD
7000 TB

1 DWPD

Ultimately, Seagate is hoping to sell the IronWolf SSDs to prosumers, creative pros, SMB, and SME NAS users. Prosumers and creative professionals with 10G-capable NAS units stand to benefit from the bandwidth benefits of flash-equipped bays. While enterprise SSDs are the way to go for all-flash arrays with write-heavy workloads, other SSD-in-NAS use-cases in the SMB and SME space can benefit from SSDs such as the IronWolf 110.


This giveaway is running through July 26th and is open to all US residents. To enter, please visit our Gleam.io contest entry page.



Source: AnandTech – Giveaway: Seagate Ironwolf 110 SSD (480GB)

The Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB Gaming Mechanical Keyboard Review: An Ergonomic Masterpiece

Today we are taking a look at the Freestyle Edge RGB, the successor to the the first ergonomic mechanical keyboard that we ever reviewed, the Freestyle Edge. Although its name suggests that the company just added RGB lighting to the initial version of the keyboard, as we’ll see in this review, Kinesis has made several and significant changes to the overall Freestyle Edge design.



Source: AnandTech – The Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB Gaming Mechanical Keyboard Review: An Ergonomic Masterpiece

Arm Flexible Access: Design the SoC Before Spending Money

One of the critical ways in which the Arm licensing model works relates to how its customers acquires Arm’s IP, the architecture licenses, or access, along with royalty payments. Every customer, especially the big ones on the leading edge, is different, and we’ve gone through how the Arm business model works in detail in a series of articles back in 2013. Today, Arm is taking a different step in how vendors can approach most of its popular IP for the simple task of design – without having to open the wallet to buy a license.



Source: AnandTech – Arm Flexible Access: Design the SoC Before Spending Money

AMD’s Eight-Core Ryzen 7 2700X Now Available for $200

As a part of Prime Day deals at Amazon, AMD’s eight-core Ryzen 7 2700X processor is now available for $199.99, which is $129 off its original MSRP. This is the lowest price for this eight-core processor with an unlocked multiplier ever.


AMD’s Ryzen 7 2700X is the company’s former flagship CPU that has eight cores with SMT, features a 16 MB L3 cache and runs at 3.7 GHz default clocks. The chip also has two DDR-2933 memory channels and is compatible with contemporary AM4 motherboards that are available widely and at different price points. Since we are talking about AMD’s X-series processor, it also has the company’s Extended Frequency Range (XFR) feature for an added performance boost.


Originally priced at $329, AMD’s Ryzen now costs $199.99 at Amazon because of its Prime Day deals, which is also the current price of the ‘slower’ AMD Ryzen 7 2700 that lacks the XFR capability.
















AMD Ryzen 2000-Series CPUss
  Ryzen 7 2700X Ryzen 7 2700 Ryzen 5 2600X Ryzen 5 2600
CPU Cores/Threads 8 / 16 8 / 16 6 / 12 6 / 12
Base CPU Frequency 3.7 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.4 GHz
Turbo CPU Frequency 4.3 GHz 4.1 GHz 4.2 GHz 3.9 GHz
TDP @ Base Frequency 105 W 65 W 95 W 65 W
L1 Cache I: 64K. D: 32K I: 64K. D: 32K I: 64K. D: 32K I: 64K. D: 32K
L2 Cache 512 KB/core 512 KB/core 512 KB/core 512 KB/core
L3 Cache 16 MB 16 MB 16 MB 16 MB
DRAM Support DDR4-2933

Dual Channel
DDR4-2933

Dual Channel
DDR4-2933

Dual Channel
DDR4-2933

Dual Channel
PCIe Lanes (CPU) 16 Free + 4 NVMe 16 Free + 4 NVMe 16 Free + 4 NVMe 16 Free + 4 NVMe
Original MSRP $329 $299 $229 $199
Price at Press Time $199 $199 $159 $139
Bundled Cooler AMD Prism RGB AMD Spire RGB AMD Spire AMD Stealth


To make the deal even more attractive, the Ryzen 7 2700X comes with AMD’s Prism RGB cooling system, which is rated for a 105 W TDP.


Keep in mind that since this is a part of Amazon’s Prime Day campaign, the day is eligible for around ~35 hours after press time, so make it quick if you want the Ryzen 7 2700X for $199.99.


Related Reading:


Source: Amazon



Source: AnandTech – AMD’s Eight-Core Ryzen 7 2700X Now Available for 0