After the Galaxy Fold breaks in the hands of reviewers, Samsung delays launch

The $2,000 Samsung Galaxy Fold was slated to come out April 26 in the US. It was supposed to be a triumph of Samsung’s display technology—a product years in the making that would redefine the smartphone. Instead, it’s being delayed. A report from The Wall Street Journal says the phone has been delayed until “at least next month.” The report cites “people familiar with the matter” and says that the original launch plans were changed due to “problems with phones being used by reviewers.”

Samsung was suspiciously protective of the Galaxy Fold in the run-up to launch. It was announced alongside the Galaxy S10 in February, but while the S10 was put on display to be touched and tapped, the Galaxy Fold was only shown in a glass box. It wasn’t until last week that people outside of Samsung were finally able to try the Galaxy Fold, when Samsung handed out review units to select members of the press. There were always durability concerns about the folding display, but when devices in the hands of reviewers sometimes lasted a single day before the displays died, the alarm bells started ringing.

The report from the Journal says, “The new rollout is expected in the coming weeks, though a firm date has yet to be determined.” Apparently Samsung has flagged the current hinge design as one of the issues causing an early death. “Though the company’s internal investigation remains ongoing, the Galaxy Fold phone’s reported issues stem from problems affecting the handset’s hinge and extra pressure applied to the internal screen,” the report says.

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Source: Ars Technica – After the Galaxy Fold breaks in the hands of reviewers, Samsung delays launch

Microplastics can travel on the wind, polluting pristine regions

The Pyrenees mountains, now with microplastics.

Enlarge / The Pyrenees mountains, now with microplastics. (credit: flickr user: Paula Funnell)

Microplastics may be having a moment in the spotlight, as the public is increasingly aware of their presence in the environment around us. But as more evidence of their presence comes to light, it’s becoming clearer that we don’t yet have a handle on how big or bad the problem is. A huge amount of small plastic particles end up in the sea, but recent research has also found them in in lakes and mountain river floodplains, and even as airborne pollution in megacities.

A new paper in Nature Geoscience reports finding microplastics in a region that should be pristine: the French Pyrenees mountains. The researchers estimated that the particles could have traveled from as far as 95 km away, but they suggest that it could be possible for microplastics to travel even further on the wind—meaning that even places relatively untouched by humans are now being polluted by our plastics.

The mystery of the disappearing plastic

Every year, millions of tonnes of plastic are produced. In 2016, this figure was estimated to be around 335 million tonnes. We have no idea where most of this ends up. The amounts that are recovered in recycling plants and landfill don’t match the amount being produced. Some of it stays in use, sometimes for decades, which explains part of the discrepancy. An estimated 10 percent ends up in the oceans. Although these numbers could change with further research, there’s still a gap.

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Source: Ars Technica – Microplastics can travel on the wind, polluting pristine regions

This semi-autonomous truck tech could seriously boost fuel efficiency

This semi-autonomous truck tech could seriously boost fuel efficiency

Enlarge (credit: Peloton)

Hype necessarily recedes as the blunt realities of actually developing autonomous vehicles sets in. For the companies developing robotaxis, that means a scaling back of ambition (like Waymo) or the pushing back of timelines (just about every major OEM). In the trucking sector, we’ve seen this as a splash of cold water poured over the idea of driverless road trains speeding along highways. But a company called Peloton thinks that running two big rigs close together can still work—and still boost fuel efficiency and safety—as long as you keep humans drivers in the cab and in the loop.

Although Peloton’s PlatoonPro tech involves some clever vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-cloud (V2C) technology, it only counts as level 1 automation on the SAE scale. That’s because the system only links together the accelerating and braking functions in the platoon; the human driver in each cab is still responsible for steering and remains in charge.

Conceptually, the idea is an evolution of the adaptive cruise control system already fitted to many cars—and even some class 8 trucks—already on the road. These systems use information from a forward-looking radar to match the speed to a vehicle ahead, maintaining a constant gap between the two as the one in front speeds up or slows down. Peloton’s approach leverages this idea, but it adds the V2C element (using 4G).

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Source: Ars Technica – This semi-autonomous truck tech could seriously boost fuel efficiency

Here’s what we know, and what we don’t, about the Crew Dragon accident

SpaceX's Crew Dragon Spacecraft completed a pad abort test in May, 2015. This image shows the vehicle's eight SuperDraco thrusters firing as intended.

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Spacecraft completed a pad abort test in May, 2015. This image shows the vehicle’s eight SuperDraco thrusters firing as intended. (credit: SpaceX)

During a series of engine tests of SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft this past Saturday, the vehicle experienced what the company has characterized as an “anomaly.” Based upon an unauthorized leaked video of the accident, the company was counting down toward a firing of the Dragon’s SuperDraco thrusters when the vehicle exploded. SpaceX has not validated the video, but it is consistent with verbal accounts of the failure that have been shared with Ars.

After the accident, large dramatic clouds of orange smoke billowed above “Landing Zone 1,” where SpaceX conducted Saturday’s engine tests. According to one source, the orange plumes were the result of between one and two tons of nitrogen tetroxide—the oxidizer used by Dragon’s SuperDraco engines—burning at the location. After a dramatic weekend, what follows is a summary of what we know, what we don’t know, and where SpaceX goes from here.

What was destroyed?

The Crew Dragon capsule in question is the same one that successfully flew a demonstration mission to the International Space Station in March. The spacecraft was being prepared for a launch abort test this summer. During this test, the Dragon would have launched from Florida on a Falcon 9 booster and then fired its powerful SuperDraco engines to show that the Dragon could pull itself safely away from the rocket in case of a problem with the booster before or during flight.

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Source: Ars Technica – Here’s what we know, and what we don’t, about the Crew Dragon accident

Galaxy S10+ review: Too many compromises for the sky-high price

Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S smartphone line is back with the Galaxy S10 and S10+. Since the launch of the Galaxy S8 in 2017, Samsung has stuck with the same basic design for two years across four major devices: the S8, Note8, S9, and Note9. The Galaxy S10 firmly fits into the Galaxy S8 family tree, but with new display and fingerprint technology, the S10 represents the biggest design upgrade since that release in 2017.

As usual, Samsung is gunning for the title of “spec-sheet champion” with the Galaxy S10, and the company is turning in devices with bigger displays, bigger batteries, faster SoCs, more RAM, and more storage. This is one of the first devices that gives us a look at the new Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 SoC, and it’s also one of the first devices with “Wi-Fi 6,” aka 802.11ax support. The S10 is also the first device with a Qualcomm-made ultrasonic fingerprint reader, and it features Samsung’s new “hole-punch” display tech for the camera cutout. If all that’s not enough for you, the Galaxy S10+ can hit even more stratospherically high configurations—and prices—that would rival some laptops, topping out at 12GB of RAM and 1TB of storage for a whopping $1,600.

We reviewed the bigger Galaxy S10+, where even the base configuration results in a $1,000 smartphone. And if spending that much cash, we’re not really in the mood for the kinds of excuses and compromises that would be acceptable at a lower price point. When a device manufacturer turns up with sky-high prices like this, it’s only fair to go in with sky-high expectations.

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Source: Ars Technica – Galaxy S10+ review: Too many compromises for the sky-high price

Ars asks: What’s stopping your workplace from adopting newer technology?

Artist's impression of some fancy tech that you probably can't have because the company that makes it isn't on your company's list of approved vendors.

Enlarge / Artist’s impression of some fancy tech that you probably can’t have because the company that makes it isn’t on your company’s list of approved vendors. (credit: Caiaimage / Robert Daly / Getty)

One of the things I enjoy most about writing for Ars is the opportunity to interact with such an enormous pool of brilliant IT folks. The Ars readership is overflowing with that most valuable of demographics: the proverbial “IT decision maker,” or just “ITDM.” From the sysadmin trenches to the C-suite, you guys do it all—not just turning the wrenches that keep business operational, but deciding which wrenches to buy, too.

But even while so many of us work at businesses whose products shape the future, as ITDMs we also often find ourselves faced with a tremendous number of obstacles when it comes to modernizing our own business tech and processes. You all know the drill, because you’ve all been through it—a new vendor shows up with a product that seems like it would solve so many of your problems, and you’re interested in evaluating it, but the solution they’re pitching gets shot down by a steering committee or design review board because it might require some unforecasted expense to conduct a mandatory IT security audit of the thing. Or because the head of the steering committee once had a bad experience with that vendor three jobs ago. Or simply because it’s different, and here at $COMPANY, we do things a certain way.

Or perhaps you work in a large company with a tremendous amount of “IT inertia,” and change happens as slowly as steering the Titanic. Maybe your company sees current and future IT trends like “edge computing” or the “hybrid cloud” not as desirable directions but as enormous security and regulatory nightmares waiting to be unleashed. Maybe you work in an industry with iron-clad change control requirements; maybe you’re at a Fortune 100 company that is just now starting to consider alternatives to the traditional “datacenter full of servers and SANs” architecture.

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Source: Ars Technica – Ars asks: What’s stopping your workplace from adopting newer technology?

Supercooled water in “snowball chamber” might be able to find dark matter

Still photograph of supercooled water turning into snow, shot on an iPhone camera at 120 FPS slow-motion.

Enlarge / Still photograph of supercooled water turning into snow, shot on an iPhone camera at 120 FPS slow-motion. (credit: Matthew M. Szydagis)

Like many people, physicist Matthew Szydagis has been amused by all those YouTube videos showing people banging on a bottle filled with water, causing it to quickly freeze in response to the blow. The trick is to supercool the water beforehand—that is, cool it below the freezing point without the water actually freezing. (Yes, it’s possible.) But when he saw the same phenomenon depicted in Disney’s 2013 animated film Frozen, he realized he might be able to exploit the effect to hunt for dark matter, that most elusive of substances.

The result is his so-called “snowball chamber,” which relies on a newly discovered property of supercooled water. A professor at SUNY’s University of Albany, Szydagis gave an overview of this research at the American Physical Society’s annual April meeting, held earlier this month in Washington, DC. A draft paper can be found on arXiv, and a final version is being prepared for journal submission.

“All of my work is motivated by the search for dark matter, a form of matter we’re sure is out there because we can observe its indirect gravitational effects,” Szydagis said. “It makes up a significant fraction of the universe, but we have yet to uncover direct, conclusive and unambiguous evidence of it within the lab.” The detector could also be useful for detecting nuclear weapons in cargo, for understanding cloud formation, and for studying how certain mammals supercool their blood when they hibernate.

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Source: Ars Technica – Supercooled water in “snowball chamber” might be able to find dark matter

DNA from medieval Crusader skeletons suggests surprising diversity

DNA from medieval Crusader skeletons suggests surprising diversity

Enlarge (credit: Claude Doumet-Serhal)

European soldiers and civilians poured into the Levant from in the 12th and 13th centuries, often killing or displacing local Muslim populations and establishing their own settlements in an effort to seize control of sites sacred to three major religious groups.

But in a new study, DNA from the skeletons of nine soldiers hints that the armies of the Crusades were more diverse and more closely linked with local people in Lebanon than historians previously assumed. The genetic evidence suggests that the Crusaders also recruited from among local populations and European soldiers sometimes married local women and raised children, some of whom may have grown up to fight in later campaigns.

Living and dying side by side

For centuries, the mingled, charred bones of at least 25 soldiers lay buried in two mass graves near the ruins of the Castle of St. Louis, a 12th- to 13th-century Crusader stronghold near Sidon, in south Lebanon. Several of the skeletons (all apparently male) bore the marks of violent death, and the artifacts mingled with the bones—buckles of medieval European design, along with a coin minted in Italy in 1245 to commemorate the Crusades—mark the pit’s occupants as dead Crusader soldiers, burned and buried in the aftermath of a battle. From nine of them, geneticist Marc Haber and his colleagues at the Wellcome Sanger Institute obtained usable DNA sequences. They offer a rare look into the ranks of the soldiers who fought on one side of the 200-year series of wars.

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Source: Ars Technica – DNA from medieval Crusader skeletons suggests surprising diversity

Mazda brings a new diesel CX-5 SUV to the US—but why?

You'd have to look carefully at the CX-5's badges to tell whether it was one of the new diesel-powered versions.

Enlarge / You’d have to look carefully at the CX-5’s badges to tell whether it was one of the new diesel-powered versions. (credit: Mazda)

When Mazda invited us to a roundtable discussion about powertrain technology at this year’s New York auto show, it was easy to say yes. After all, the company is responsible for a significant recent breakthrough in internal combustion engine technology. So you can imagine my surprise when it turned out the topic on Mazda’s mind was the introduction of its Skyactiv-D diesel engine to the North American market, under the hood of the (excellent) CX-5 SUV. Intrigued, I had to find out why the Japanese automaker was taking this step.

Diesel’s fall from grace

You can be forgiven for thinking that “diesel” was now a dirty word. For a while, this liquid hydrocarbon fuel looked like it might be an important tool in helping fight climate change. After all, diesel engines are much more efficient than ones that run gasoline, so you can drive further between filling stations and emit less CO2 while doing it. But CO2 isn’t the only problematic component of diesel exhaust. A more immediate danger posed by diesel exhaust is the soup of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulates that result as combustion products. While CO2 will wreck our climate in the coming decades, NOx damages peoples’ lungs today. And it’s NOx that’s responsible for diesel’s fall from grace.

Or, more accurately, it’s been the widespread lying by industry to regulators about the exact amounts of NOx emissions from their cars. The most well-known culprit has been Volkswagen Group. In 2015 it got caught lying to federal regulators in the US and the penalties have been stiff. Executives have been prosecuted. Hundreds of thousands of cars have had to be bought back from owners, billions of dollars in fines were levied, and an entirely new business plan had to be created to rapidly electrify one of the three biggest car companies in the world by the middle of the next decade.

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Source: Ars Technica – Mazda brings a new diesel CX-5 SUV to the US—but why?

Hannah TV adaptation sacrifices magic of original film for typical teen angst

Esme Creed-Miles plays the titular teen assassin in Amazon Prime's new series, <em>Hannah</em>.

Enlarge / Esme Creed-Miles plays the titular teen assassin in Amazon Prime’s new series, Hannah. (credit: YouTube/Amazon Prime)

An isolated teenaged girl genetically engineered to be an assassin must elude rogue CIA agents intent on terminating her in Hannah, Amazon’s adaption of the 2011 film of the same name. It’s a gritty, competent thriller, with strong performances from a talented cast, and has already been renewed for a second season. The problem is that no matter how much one tries to separate the series from the film, comparisons are inevitable. And in almost all respects, the TV adaptation comes up short.

(Some spoilers for the series and the 2011 film below.)

Not everyone was a fan of Director Joe Wright’s original film, with its strange mix of revenge thriller and dark coming-of-age fairytale. But it’s one of my recent favorites for precisely those elements, driven by an exquisitely unsettling performance by Saoirse Ronan in the titular role. Ronan had this otherworldly presence of untouched innocence, combined with a ruthless hunter’s instinct, as we saw in the very first scene when she kills and dresses a deer with just a bow and arrow and a hunting knife.

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Source: Ars Technica – Hannah TV adaptation sacrifices magic of original film for typical teen angst

Happy 30th B-Day, Game Boy: Here are six reasons why you’re #1

Thirty years ago this week, Nintendo released the Game Boy, its first handheld video game console. Excited Japanese customers snatched up the innovative monochrome handheld by the thousands, which retailed for 12,500 yen (about $94 at 1989 rates) at launch—a small price to pay for what seemed to be an NES in your pocket. Nintendo initially offered four games for the new Game Boy: Super Mario Land, Baseball, Alleyway, and Yakuman (a mahjong game), but the number of available titles quickly grew into the hundreds.

Later that year, the Game Boy hit the US at $89.99 with a secret weapon—Tetris as its pack-in game. Selling over a million units during the first Christmas season, the Game Boy proved equally successful in the US, and that success was by no means short-lived: to date, Nintendo has sold 118.69 million units of the original Game Boy line (not including Game Boy Advance) worldwide, making it the longest running dynasty in the video game business. So in honor of the Game Boy’s twentieth (Editor’s note: now thirtieth!) anniversary, we give you six reasons why the Game Boy dominated the handheld video game market during most of its astounding multi-decade run.

1. Tetris

It’s common pop-marketing knowledge these days that every new hardware platform needs a “killer app” to truly succeed. In the Game Boy’s case, Tetris filled that role perfectly.

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Source: Ars Technica – Happy 30th B-Day, Game Boy: Here are six reasons why you’re #1

“Natural” bottled water has natural arsenic contamination, testing finds

Water can pick up arsenic from geological, agricultural, or industrial sources.

Enlarge / Water can pick up arsenic from geological, agricultural, or industrial sources. (credit: Getty | Nurphoto)

Several brands of bottled water contain concerning levels of arsenic contamination, according to an investigation by Consumer Reports.

The worst offenders in the report were Starkey, a brand owned by Whole Foods and marketed as water in its “natural state,” and Peñafiel, owned by Keurig Dr Pepper and imported from Mexico.

Samples of Peñafiel tested by CR had arsenic levels that averaged 18.1 parts per billion, well above the federal allowable limit of 10ppb set by the Food and Drug Administration. Testing of Whole Foods’ Starkey Water revealed levels at or just a smidge below federal limits, with results ranging from 9.48 ppb to 10.1 ppb.

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Source: Ars Technica – “Natural” bottled water has natural arsenic contamination, testing finds

A mystery agent is doxing Iran’s hackers and dumping their code

Stylized photo of desktop computer.

Enlarge (credit: Lino Mirgeler/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Nearly three years after the mysterious group called the Shadow Brokers began disemboweling the NSA’s hackers and leaking their hacking tools onto the open Web, Iran’s hackers are getting their own taste of that unnerving experience. For the last month, a mystery person or group has been targeting a top Iranian hacker team, dumping its secret data, tools, and even identities onto a public Telegram channel—and the leak shows no signs of stopping.

Since March 25, a Telegram channel called Read My Lips or Lab Dookhtegan—which translates from Farsi as “sewn lips”—has been systematically spilling the secrets of a hacker group known as APT34 or OilRig, which researchers have long believed to be working in service of the Iranian government. So far, the leaker or leakers have published a collection of the hackers’ tools, evidence of their intrusion points for 66 victim organizations across the world, the IP addresses of servers used by Iranian intelligence, and even the identities and photographs of alleged hackers working with the OilRig group.

“We are exposing here the cyber tools (APT34 / OILRIG) that the ruthless Iranian Ministry of Intelligence has been using against Iran’s neighboring countries, including names of the cruel managers, and information about the activities and the goals of these cyber-attacks,” read the original message posted to Telegram by the hackers in late March. “We hope that other Iranian citizens will act for exposing this regime’s real ugly face!”

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Source: Ars Technica – A mystery agent is doxing Iran’s hackers and dumping their code

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft had an anomaly during tests Saturday

Following a successful demonstration mission of its Crew Dragon spacecraft in March, SpaceX has been preparing that vehicle for a critical launch abort test this summer. During this upcoming test flight, after launching from Florida on a Falcon 9 booster, the Dragon will fire its powerful SuperDraco engines to show that the spacecraft can pull itself safely away from the rocket in case of a problem with the booster.

On Saturday, as part of preparations for this abort test, the company experienced some sort of anomaly. According to a company spokesperson: “Earlier today, SpaceX conducted a series of engine tests on a Crew Dragon test vehicle on our test stand at Landing Zone 1 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The initial tests completed successfully but the final test resulted in an anomaly on the test stand. Ensuring that our systems meet rigorous safety standards and detecting anomalies like this prior to flight are the main reasons why we test. Our teams are investigating and working closely with our NASA partners.”

It is not immediately clear how significantly this incident will affect SpaceX as it works toward Dragon’s first crewed mission, which will carry astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station. Previously, sources have said that flight could occur by about October under ideal conditions. If the problems were serious, Saturday’s accident may substantially delay this schedule—although in the past SpaceX has shown a propensity to rapidly diagnose failures and return to flight quickly, with just 4.5 months of downtime after a rocket failure in September, 2016.

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Source: Ars Technica – SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft had an anomaly during tests Saturday

You’re not getting enough sleep—and it’s killing you

(GERMANY OUT) Schlaflosigkeit, Frau mit Wecker   (Photo by Wodicka/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Enlarge / (GERMANY OUT) Schlaflosigkeit, Frau mit Wecker (Photo by Wodicka/ullstein bild via Getty Images) (credit: Ullstein Bild | Getty Images)

The whole world is exhausted. And it’s killing us.

But particularly me. As I write this, I’m at TED 2019 in Vancouver, which is a weeklong marathon of talks and workshops and coffee meetings and experiences and demos and late-night trivia contests and networking, networking, networking. Meanwhile, I’m sick as a dog with a virus I caught from my 3-year-old, I’m on deadline for what feels like a bazillion stories, and I’m pregnant, which means I need coffee but can’t have too much, and need sleep but can only lay on my left side, and can’t breathe without sitting propped up with a pillow anyway, since I can’t safely take any cold medication.

According to neuroscientist Matthew Walker, I’m doing serious damage to my health—and life—by not sleeping enough.

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Source: Ars Technica – You’re not getting enough sleep—and it’s killing you

Review: Santa Clarita Diet S3 blends slapstick, satire with genuine heart

Sheila (Drew Barrymore) and Joel (Tim Olyphant) Hammond are married real estate agents with an undead secret.

Enlarge / Sheila (Drew Barrymore) and Joel (Tim Olyphant) Hammond are married real estate agents with an undead secret. (credit: Netflix)

The Santa Clarita Diet, Netflix’s smart, slyly satiric sitcom about a zombie outbreak in suburban Southern California, has largely flown under the pop culture radar since it debuted in February 2017. And that’s a shame, because it’s easily one of the best half-hour comedies on TV right now. Season 3 brought the same winning blend of satire, snappy dialogue, slapstick, and of course, plenty of zombie-munching gore.

(Some spoilers below.)

The series centers on Joel and Sheila Hammond (Tim Olyphant and Drew Barrymore), married real estate agents in Santa Clarita who find their lives irrevocably altered after Sheila has an extreme upchucking incident while showing a house to prospective clients. She thinks it’s a bad case of food poisoning but soon begins to crave human flesh. The upside: she feels better than she has in years, and her increased libido kick-starts the Hammonds’ previously humdrum sex life into overdrive. Season 1 was a bit uneven, especially in the earlier episodes, but the show found its stride by the end of that first 10-episode run, and both seasons 2 and 3 are sheer bingeable delights.

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Source: Ars Technica – Review: Santa Clarita Diet S3 blends slapstick, satire with genuine heart

Review: The indestructible humanity of A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World

Warning: Mild spoilers ahead.

Dystopian stories take many forms, but it’s a rare dystopian novel that prominently features man’s best friend. Author of the Oversight and Stoneheart trilogies, C.A. Fletcher doesn’t hide the importance of dogs in his latest novel. Aptly titled A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World, it follows a young boy named Griz as he goes on a journey to retrieve his stolen pet.

“Dogs were with us from the very beginning,” Griz writes. “And those that remain are still with us now, here at the end of the world.”

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Source: Ars Technica – Review: The indestructible humanity of A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World

These are the best new vehicles of the 2019 New York International Auto Show

These are the best new vehicles of the 2019 New York International Auto Show

Enlarge (credit: Jonathan Gitlin / Aurich Lawson)

NEW YORK—On Friday morning, the annual New York International Auto Show opened its doors to the public. In stark contrast to last year—when I foolishly predicted that NYIAS was now the premier US auto show—this year’s event feels very lackluster.

The Shanghai Auto Show is partly to blame. It opened earlier this week and pretty much every automaker with something new to show chose China over the US. In fact, some brands like BMW and Volvo weren’t present at all. The Internet didn’t help either, as what little new metal there was coming to the Big Apple got shown off online in the weeks leading up.

But given that we missed both LA and Detroit in recent months, I braved Amtrak’s rapidly deteriorating service from DC to wander the Javits center and see what was neat among the vehicles that did show up in NYC. While have some other stories from NYIAS to come, we’re kicking off this year’s event with our Best Of awards.

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Source: Ars Technica – These are the best new vehicles of the 2019 New York International Auto Show

The hydrogen fuel strategy behind Nikola’s truck dream

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Source: Ars Technica – The hydrogen fuel strategy behind Nikola’s truck dream

Marcus Hutchins, slayer of WannaCry worm, pleads guilty to malware charges

Then-23-year-old security researcher Marcus Hutchins in his bedroom in Ilfracombe, UK, in July 2017, just weeks before his arrest on malware charges.

Enlarge / Then-23-year-old security researcher Marcus Hutchins in his bedroom in Ilfracombe, UK, in July 2017, just weeks before his arrest on malware charges. (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Marcus Hutchins, the security researcher who helped neutralize the virulent WannaCry ransomware worm, has pleaded guilty to federal charges of creating and distributing malware used to break into online bank accounts.

“I regret these actions and accept full responsibility for my mistakes,” Hutchins wrote in a short post. “Having grown up, I’ve since been using the same skills that I misused several years ago for constructive purposes. I will continue to devote my time to keeping people safe from malware attacks.”

Hutchins was changed in August 2017 with creating Kronos, a banking trojan that stole online bank account passwords from infected computers. A superseding indictment filed 10 months later charged him with 10 felony counts that alleged he created a second piece of malware called UPAS Kit. Hutchins, whose online persona MalwareTech attracts more than 143,000 followers on Twitter, had a league of vocal defenders claiming the allegations were false.

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Source: Ars Technica – Marcus Hutchins, slayer of WannaCry worm, pleads guilty to malware charges