Samsung’s Galaxy Z Fold 2 is official, comes with a ton of improvements

Samsung Unpacked 2020 is happening today, but the star of the show, the Galaxy Z Fold 2, only got a light teasing. We got official press pictures, one or two specs, and a promise of more info on September 1. The good news is that there was also a full spec sheet leak today from XDA’s Max Weinbach, and it fills in most of the blanks.

Samsung’s second-generation foldable is officially the “Galaxy Z Fold 2,” a slight name change from “Samsung Galaxy Fold” that puts it in the same class as Samsung’s other foldable, the Galaxy Z Flip. The smartphone/tablet hybrid is very much in the mold of the Galaxy Fold 1 from last year, but it has a ton of iterative yearly upgrades and refinements

The most noticeable upgrade is that the outer screen now fills the front of the phone. XDA’s specs list the display as a 6.2-inch, 2260×816 OLED display with a crazy 25:9 aspect ratio. This is dramatically bigger than the 4.6-inch display that shipped on the Fold 1, which looked really out of place, with somewhere around a 50 percent body-to-display ratio. The new display is still very tall and skinny, but the “phone” part of the Fold 2 now looks more like a smartphone.

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Source: Ars Technica – Samsung’s Galaxy Z Fold 2 is official, comes with a ton of improvements

Star Trek: Lower Decks review: Comfort food with a comic twist

Screenshot from Star Trek: Lower Decks trailer

Enlarge / Ensigns Tendi (Noël Wells), Rutherford (Eugene Cordero), Boimler (Jack Quaid), and Mariner (Tawny Newsome) reporting for duty. (credit: YouTube/CBS All Access)

Star Trek has been many things in the past 54 years: eight television series, 13 films, the better part of a thousand total novels, and the beating heart that arguably created modern fandom as it now stands. But for all the humor—both intentional and not—scattered throughout its storied history, there is one frontier it has not yet explored: the half-hour comedy.

The ninth and newest Star Trek series aims to change all that. Lower Decks is a half-hour animated series set in the timeline two years after the conclusion of Star Trek: Voyager. The half-hour comedy cartoon format is a definite change of pace from ViacomCBS’ other recent Star Trek offerings, the heavily serialized dramas Picard and Discovery. The question any fan might have then, is simple: does it hold up?

And the answer is yes, mostly—but don’t set your expectations to “stunned.”

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Source: Ars Technica – Star Trek: Lower Decks review: Comfort food with a comic twist

BP plans to cut oil production 40 percent by 2030

BP plans to cut oil production 40 percent by 2030

Enlarge (credit: b k)

In February, BP announced a pledge to (mostly) reach net-zero CO­2­ emissions by 2050, a noteworthy change of course steered by new CEO Bernard Looney. BP had long dabbled in promoting an interest in greener pursuits, but these promises pointed toward a more serious shift.

On Monday, the company released some specifics for the coming decade, describing “a new strategy that will reshape [BP’s] business as it pivots from being an international oil company focused on producing resources to an integrated energy company focused on delivering solutions for customers.” The new details are focused on investors, as the plan involves about a 50-percent reduction in dividends for shareholders. That money will instead go to paying down debts—partly a response to the economic consequences of COVID-19—as well as funding some of the planned investments.

BP says it will increase investment in “low carbon energy” from $500 million to around $5 billion per year by 2030. That includes building renewable electricity generation reaching 50 gigawatts in capacity, as well as pushing into the nascent hydrogen, biofuel, and carbon capture industries. It also includes betting on the electric vehicle charging business, with a goal of expanding from the current 7,500 charging points to over 70,000.

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Source: Ars Technica – BP plans to cut oil production 40 percent by 2030

Horizon Zero Dawn on PC: Not the optimized port we were hoping for

In still-image form, <em>Horizon Zero Dawn</em> sure is a looker on PC. But it's a video game, not a slideshow, and that brings us to some bad news.

Enlarge / In still-image form, Horizon Zero Dawn sure is a looker on PC. But it’s a video game, not a slideshow, and that brings us to some bad news. (credit: Sony Interactive Entertainment)

Horizon Zero Dawn was an easy Ars pick for one of 2017’s top five video games, but a certain subset of our readers disagreed. This was due almost entirely to the game’s PS4 exclusivity. Never mind that its developer, Guerrilla Games, is a wholly owned Sony subsidiary; we want it on PC, our readers declared.

Historically, Sony Interactive Entertainment (not to be confused with other Sony publishing arms) has been cagey about letting its PlayStation exclusives land elsewhere, but the past couple of years has seen that stance shift, with games like Heavy Rain and Death Stranding making their PC debuts. Death Stranding stands out as a particularly impressive example of a console game’s PC port gone right.

I remarked at the time that DS‘ PC version was good news for HZD, mostly because they share the same underlying tech, Guerrilla’s Decima Engine. But today, two days before HZD‘s “complete” edition lands on Steam for $50, I’m here to report that their shared tech hasn’t been paid forward with identical PC-version results.

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Source: Ars Technica – Horizon Zero Dawn on PC: Not the optimized port we were hoping for

Ex-Googler Levandowski gets 18 months in prison for trade-secret theft

Anthony Levandowski walking to a courthouse while holding a cardboard box.

Enlarge / Anthony Levandowski arrives for a court appearance at the Phillip Burton Federal Building and US Courthouse on November 13, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (credit: Getty Images | Justin Sullivan )

Ex-Google engineer Anthony Levandowski yesterday was sentenced to 18 months in prison following his March guilty plea for stealing a confidential document related to Google’s self-driving technology.

Levandowski’s lawyers last week asked a judge in US District Court for the Northern District of California to let him off without any prison time, arguing that a year of home confinement, a fine, restitution, and community service would be sufficient punishment. The federal government asked for a 27-month prison sentence.

While handing down the 18-month sentence, US District Judge William Alsup said that a sentence without imprisonment would give “a green light to every future brilliant engineer to steal trade secrets,” according to a Reuters report. Levandowski was originally charged with 33 counts of stealing trade secrets by downloading thousands of documents to his personal laptop in December 2015 shortly before he left Google to work on his startup, Otto, which was acquired by Uber for a reported $680 million in August 2016. In a plea deal, Levandowksi admitted to stealing one document called “Chauffeur TL weekly updates,” which tracked the progress of Google’s “Project Chauffeur” that later became Waymo. Prosecutors dropped the other charges.

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Source: Ars Technica – Ex-Googler Levandowski gets 18 months in prison for trade-secret theft

Big Nurse gets her origin story in trailer for prequel series Ratched

Sarah Paulson plays Nurse Mildred Ratched in Netflix’s prequel to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.

Fans of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest—whether Ken Kesey’s 1962 novel or the 1975 Oscar-winning film starring Jack Nicholson—know that the sadistic, tyrannical Nurse Ratched is a crucial antagonist driving the story of a rebellious inmate in a psychiatric hospital. Now she’s getting her own back story in the form of a new prequel series, Ratched. Netflix dropped the first trailer for the series yesterday.

(Spoilers for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest book and film below.)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is set in a psychiatric hospital in Salem, Oregon, where Randle Patrick McMurphy is sent after faking insanity to escape a prison farm sentence. Nurse Ratched (aka Big Nurse) rules the place with an iron hand, systematically abusing the inmates under her charge. She maintains order by withholding basic necessities, medications, or patient privileges, but McMurphy’s rebellious nature challenges her authority, even in the face of shock therapy.

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Source: Ars Technica – Big Nurse gets her origin story in trailer for prequel series Ratched

Formula E returns today with the first of six races in nine days

On Wednesday afternoon, Formula E returns to action in Berlin. And yes, you read that right—racing on a Wednesday. The electric racing series started its sixth season in Saudi Arabia back in November and managed to run a total of five races (out of a planned 14) before COVID-19 turned up and shut everything down. Tentative plans called for a return to racing in July in New York City, but with the pandemic raging out of control in the US, that turned out to be a non-starter.

Instead, the series got creative. Rather than continue to cross the globe, with all those attendant risks, it has decamped to Germany, a country where public health measures have largely worked to control viral infections. So it will wrap up this season with a total of six more races, held over the next nine days, all taking place at the Tempelhof Airport in Berlin.

To make things more interesting, the series will use three different track layouts in Berlin. For the first pair of races, which take place on Wednesday and Thursday (August 5 and 6), the cars will use a reversed version of the 10-turn, 1.5-mile (2.35km) track used in previous years. The second pair of races, which will be held on August 8 and 9, will use the traditional Berlin layout, the same 10 turns and 1.5 miles, but run counterclockwise, as in years past. And for the final two races, which take place on August 12 and 13, there’s a new 16-turn, 1.6-mile (2.5km) layout to contend with.

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Source: Ars Technica – Formula E returns today with the first of six races in nine days

Samsung’s “beans” earbuds are here, and they’re called the Galaxy Buds Live

Samsung on Tuesday announced its latest pair of true wireless earbuds, the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live. The earbuds, whose bean-shaped design caused a stir in tech circles after leaking last month, will be available starting Thursday and cost $169.99. They’ll be available in black, bronze, and white finishes.

The Galaxy Buds Live are designed to sit entirely in your ear; there’s no outward protruding “stem,” but there are small, flat tips on each earbud to keep them securely in place. Samsung says it will include two sizes of these “wingtips” in the box.

In terms of features, Samsung has equipped the Galaxy Buds Live with active noise cancellation, bringing them in competition with other true wireless pairs like Apple’s AirPods Pro and Sony’s WF-1000XM3. Samsung is going about this a little differently, however. Because the Galaxy Buds Live’s flattened design naturally lets in more ambient noise than more tightly sealed in-ear headphones like Apple’s or Sony’s pairs, Samsung wants its ANC to focus on muting low-end frequencies—an airplane cabin, a loud laundry machine, and so on—while still letting higher-pitch noises through.

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Source: Ars Technica – Samsung’s “beans” earbuds are here, and they’re called the Galaxy Buds Live

Samsung makes the $1,300 Galaxy Note 20 Ultra official

Today is Samsung’s big hardware event, Unpacked 2020, and the company’s late-2020 flagships have been announced: meet the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra and the Galaxy Note 20. Typically, Samsung has built two nearly identical phones with different size screens and bodies, but this year there are major differences between the two devices. The big news today is the prices: the Note 20 Ultra starts (starts!) at $1,299, and the Note 20 starts at $999.

The Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has a 6.9-inch, 3088×1440 120Hz display; 8GB or 12 GB of RAM; 128GB, 256, or 512GB of storage; and a 4500mAh battery. You get three cameras on the back, a 108MP main camera, a 12MP wide-angle, and a 12MP, 5x optical zoom. Earlier this year with the Galaxy S20 Ultra, Samsung promoted the 5x optical zoom as a “100x Space Zoom” through the use of cropping and AI upscaling. As you can imagine from that huge gulf between optics and output, the resulting images were a blurry, smeared mess. For the second half of the year, on the Note 20, the feature has been cut down to a “50x Super Resolution Zoom.”

As always, Samsung is offering two different SoCs. For both Note 20s, you get either the new Snapdragon 865+ or the Samsung Exynos 990 SoC, depending on the country. We expect the US will get the Snapdragon chip; Europe will get the Exynos. The Exynos models have an option for an LTE-only device, while 5G is mandatory on the Snapdragon chip, and at least some models have mmWave.

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Source: Ars Technica – Samsung makes the ,300 Galaxy Note 20 Ultra official

Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 3 is a stylish redesign without much new to say

It’s been two full years since the release of Samsung’s Galaxy Watch, and today we’re finally getting a proper followup with the announcement of the Galaxy Watch 3. If you’ve been paying attention to leaks and rumors, you’ve known for at least a few months that this refresh was coming, and with leaks of the entire hands-on experience and instructional videos in recent days, little was left to our imaginations.

Still, looking at the new Galaxy Watch is quite a treat. Samsung has refined the style of an already good-looking watch to be more stylish, modern, and versatile. It’s thinner, it’s lighter, and it packs in a slightly larger screen than its predecessor. Thankfully, the rotating bezel, one of the watch’s biggest selling points, is still present in this latest model; it’s even less chunky and more uniform with the watch facade than before.

There’s also a new Mystic Bronze colorway that strikes an excellent balance between classy and casual, bringing the total number of color options to three, with Mystic Silver and Mystic Black rounding out the trio of stainless steel watch cases. A titanium version comes only in Mystic Black at the larger of the two watch sizes. With 41mm and 45mm sizes packing 1.2- and 1.4-inch AMOLED displays, respectively, the Galaxy Watch 3 still meets 5ATM and IP68 water and dust resistance specifications. As for internals, you’ll have 1GB of RAM with 8GB on-board storage for music and apps all run by the same dual-core Exynos 9110 processor, clocked at 1.15 GHz, found in its predecessor and the more recent Galaxy Watch Active 2. LTE versions will be available through carriers at a later date.

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Source: Ars Technica – Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 3 is a stylish redesign without much new to say

Avengers video game beta impressions: Destiny, this ain’t

Avengers, assemble. (All images from this article were captured from real PS4 Pro gameplay, so this is how the Avengers look in their new 2020 video game.)

Enlarge / Avengers, assemble. (All images from this article were captured from real PS4 Pro gameplay, so this is how the Avengers look in their new 2020 video game.) (credit: Crystal Dynamics / Square Enix)

After over a year of rumors, teases, and reveals, we have finally played the upcoming Avengers video game, slated to launch on PS4, Xbox One, and Windows PC on September 4. It’s arguably the biggest Avengers-themed game ever made, in part thanks to a massive effort by developers Crystal Dynamics (makers of the modern Tomb Raider trilogy). Many of you will soon get to play the same content when the game’s beta test opens Friday, August 7, exclusively for PS4 players who preordered the game. (By month’s end, all three platforms will have open beta periods, no purchase required; more on that below.)

We’ve been careful about covering this superhero game, in part because its performance looked suspect during E3 2019 and because we couldn’t tell how its Destiny-inspired looter-shooter system would translate to the beat-’em-up genre. This beta’s selection of missions and story sequences has firmed up our suspicions on what to expect in the final game—and the news isn’t great.

Feeling weak in a world of heroes

The beta opens with an all-star superhero brawl in San Francisco, primarily atop the Golden Gate Bridge, and it may look familiar, as this previously premiered at last year’s E3. It’s a show-of-force intro, with players jumping from one familiar superhero to the next: Thor, Hulk, Iron Man, Captain America, and Black Widow. Each comes with a mix of melee, ranged, counter, and special attacks, and each can put the serious smackdown on large crowds of generic robo-soldier foes. Pummel, run, jump, and repeat.

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Source: Ars Technica – Avengers video game beta impressions: Destiny, this ain’t

#MeTooSTEM founder admits to creating Twitter persona who “died” of COVID-19

A cartoon cat face is surrounded by Twitter-logo birds.

Enlarge / Twitter drama erupted over the weekend when a much-beloved online persona supposedly died of COVID-19 complications—only to be exposed as a fake account/catfishing scheme by controversial neuroscientist and #MeTooSTEM founder BethAnn McLaughlin. (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty Images)

A segment of science Twitter was rocked over the weekend by the discovery that a long-standing, pseudonymous online member had died of COVID-19-related complications. But grief quickly turned to shock, hurt, and anger when the deceased turned out to have never existed. Rather, it was a sock puppet account that we now know was created and maintained by BethAnn McLaughlin, a neuroscientist and founder of the #MeTooSTEM advocacy group whose Twitter handle is @McLNeuro.

“I take full responsibility for my involvement in creating the @Sciencing_Bi Twitter account,” McLaughlin said in a statement provided to The New York Times through her lawyer. “My actions are inexcusable. I apologize without reservation to all the people I hurt. As I’ve reflected on my actions the last few days, it’s become clear to me that I need mental health treatment, which I’m pursuing now. My failures are mine alone, so I’m stepping away from all activities with #MeTooSTEM to ensure that it isn’t unfairly criticized for my actions.”

This certainly isn’t the first time a fake persona has manifested on social media. Way back in 2003, controversial American Enterprise Institute scholar John R. Lott Jr.. was outed by The Washington Post for creating a sock-puppet online persona, “Mary Rosh,” purportedly a former student, and using it to mount spirited defenses of his work online. In 2017, there was the case of “Jenna Abrams,” who boasted 70,000 Twitter followers; the fake persona was so convincing that she managed to spread a viral rumor that CNN’s local Boston station had accidentally aired 30 minutes of pornography late one night in November 2016.

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Source: Ars Technica – #MeTooSTEM founder admits to creating Twitter persona who “died” of COVID-19

Mulan skips US theaters, will debut on Disney+ Sept 4—for an extra $30

After delisting Mulan from a potential theatrical run in June, Disney has firmed up its plans for its newest live-action remake. Starting September 4, Mulan will premiere exclusively on Disney+ in various territories, including the United States, Canada, and New Zealand, according to Disney CEO Bob Chapek.

Unlike other Disney+ streaming premieres, however, Mulan will launch with an extra price point on top of the service’s $7/mo subscription rate. Paying Disney+ users in the US will have to fork over an additional $30 for what Chapek described as “premiere access,” which likely equates to a temporary rental of the film instead of full-blown ownership a la platforms like iTunes and Amazon Video. Other territories’ rates have not yet been confirmed. (Chapek took the opportunity to confirm that Disney+’s worldwide subscriber numbers are somewhere near 60.5 million.)

In certain territories that have not yet seen a Disney+ rollout, particularly China, Disney will move forward with a theatrical run of Mulan, which has yet to be given a release date.

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Source: Ars Technica – Mulan skips US theaters, will debut on Disney+ Sept 4—for an extra

Three seats, a V12, and a manual transmission: The GMA T.50 reveal

On Tuesday, Gordon Murray finally revealed his latest creation to the world. It’s called the T.50, and in an age of heavy hybrid hypercars, near-instantaneous semiautomatic gearboxes, and driver-flattering electronic safety nets, it is a refreshing alternative with a minimum of electronic frippery; it even uses an H-pattern gearshift with an actual clutch pedal. But that makes sense when you consider Murray’s last supercar: the McLaren F1. While many of us consider that car the greatest of all time, Murray disagrees—he describes the T.50 as improving on his mid-’90s masterpiece “in every conceivable way.”

From the perspective of a car nerd of a certain age, Murray ranks up there with the greatest of the industry’s greats. The bulk of his career was spent in Formula 1, where he designed cutting-edge, championship-winning cars for Brabham and then McLaren. After tiring of the racetrack, he turned his attention to detail to road-going sports cars, designing first the Light Car Company Rocket and then the McLaren F1, a three-seat V12 riot in carbon fiber that shattered records for acceleration, top speed, and list price, as well as blitzing the field in the 1995 24 Hours of Le Mans.

After leaving McLaren, he set his sights on making the process of building cars more sustainable and created a new production process called iStream that would allow cars to be made with 60 percent less energy. But he didn’t forget about sports cars. Murray designed a new car for TVR, although frankly at this point, the odds seem remote that it will ever enter production. And he also decided to revisit the supercar, this time forming a company bearing his own name to build it.

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Source: Ars Technica – Three seats, a V12, and a manual transmission: The GMA T.50 reveal

Ford CEO Jim Hackett retires after just 3 years—and a 40% stock slide

Two men in business casual stand next to an SUV.

Enlarge / Jim Farley, left, and Jim Hackett at a January 2019 Ford event. (credit: Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Ford has changed CEOs for the third time in six years, the company announced on Tuesday. Current CEO Jim Hackett will step down in October and be succeeded by his handpicked deputy, Chief Operating Officer Jim Farley.

Hackett made some significant changes to try to make Ford more profitable. Most dramatically, Hackett cancelled most of Ford’s car lineup in the US so the company can focus on its more profitable trucks and SUVs. Ford then announced plans for $11 billion in new investments in electric and hybrid vehicles—even as it laid off almost 20 percent of its European workforce.

“We made some significant decisions in the earliest days that were quite controversial,” Hackett said on a Tuesday conference call. “Getting out of the sedan business was a difficult question.”

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Source: Ars Technica – Ford CEO Jim Hackett retires after just 3 years—and a 40% stock slide

Beware of find-my-phone, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth, NSA tells mobile users

Photograph of a map app on a smartphone.

Enlarge (credit: Christine Wang / Flickr)

The National Security Agency is recommending that some government workers and people generally concerned about privacy turn off find-my-phone, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth whenever those services are not needed, as well as limit location data usage by apps.

“Location data can be extremely valuable and must be protected,” an advisory published on Tuesday stated. “It can reveal details about the number of users in a location, user and supply movements, daily routines (user and organizational), and can expose otherwise unknown associations between users and locations.”

NSA officials acknowledged that geolocation functions are enabled by design and are essential to mobile communications. The officials also admit that the recommended safeguards are impractical for most users. Mapping, location tracking of lost or stolen phones, automatically connecting to Wi-Fi networks, and fitness trackers and apps are just a few of the things that require fine-grained locations to work at all.

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Source: Ars Technica – Beware of find-my-phone, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth, NSA tells mobile users

Phil Schiller will step down from his role as VP of marketing

In addition to announcing new iMac models this morning, Apple took to its newsroom PR blog today to announce that prominent executive Phil Schiller will step down from his role as VP of Worldwide Marketing. However, he will continue on as an “Apple Fellow,” and Schiller will still oversee various aspects of the App Store and Apple’s events. Schiller has worked at Apple since 1987.

Greg Joswiak, one of Schiller’s lieutenants and a 20-year Apple veteran, will assume Schiller’s prior role and title. He is known as “Joz” to his colleagues, and he previously led marketing for some specific Apple products, such as the first iPhone.

Apple executives provided two public statements. First, CEO Tim Cook said:

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Source: Ars Technica – Phil Schiller will step down from his role as VP of marketing

EU launching deep probe into Google’s planned $2.1 billion Fitbit buy

Logo of Google is displayed on a smartphone by logo of Fitbit in Brussels, Belgium on August 4, 2020.

Enlarge / Logo of Google is displayed on a smartphone by logo of Fitbit in Brussels, Belgium on August 4, 2020. (credit: Dursun Aydemir | Andalou Agency | Getty Images)

Regulators in the European Union are launching a deep investigation into Google’s proposed acquisition of wearables maker Fitbit after expressing concerns that giving Google access to Fitbit’s user data could “distort competition.”

The Commission’s in-depth investigation will examine not only the potential outcomes for the advertising market if the transaction goes through, but it will also look at the effects of the deal on the digital healthcare sector and the potential for Google to lock competitors out of access to Android users.

Data provided by wearable devices “provides key insights about the life and the health situation of the users of these devices,” Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission’s head of competition, said in a written statement. “Our investigation aims to ensure that control by Google over data collected through wearable devices as a result of the transaction does not distort competition.”

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Source: Ars Technica – EU launching deep probe into Google’s planned .1 billion Fitbit buy

Apple’s AirPods and wireless charging case are down to a new low today

Apple’s AirPods and wireless charging case are down to a new low today

Enlarge (credit: Ars Technica)

Today’s Dealmaster is headlined by a new low on Apple’s AirPods and Qi wireless charging case combo, which is currently available for $140 on Amazon. This deal price is about $60 off Apple’s MSRP and roughly $30 off the usual going rate for this model on Amazon. As of this writing, it’s only a dollar more than the non-wireless charging SKU as well.

We’ve written about similar deals in the past, and in general, the AirPods remain one of the few wireless headphones that need little introduction. The gist of things should sound familiar: there’s a number of true wireless headphones that sound better and offer more robust features at this point—including Apple’s own noise-cancelling AirPods Pro—but the base AirPods have become a phenomenon for being lightweight in the ear and wonderfully simple to pair and use with iOS devices. If you’re an iPhone owner that already makes use of a Qi wireless charger, this SKU becomes a better deal, since the case here usually retails for $65 on its own.

If you don’t want new wireless earbuds, though, we also have deals on Switch and PS4 games, a top Thunderbolt 3 dock, SteelSeries gaming headsets, and more. Have a look for yourself below.

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Source: Ars Technica – Apple’s AirPods and wireless charging case are down to a new low today