Solve coding challenges at Runcode.ninja online competition, Nov. 6-9

Shozoku and ninjato are encouraged, but not strictly required, in order to compete.

Enlarge / Shozoku and ninjato are encouraged, but not strictly required, in order to compete. (credit: RunCode)

Annual programming competition Runcode.ninja is back again in its fourth year, beginning Friday, November 6. RunCode is a nonprofit organization staffed by volunteers working in their spare time and focused on providing educational opportunities for coders and infosec folks. The online event allows programmers of all experience levels to tackle a wide array of challenges, using any of 14 supported programming languages.

This year, the competition theme is “all things web”—which means that most challenges will have something to do with websites; although the “something” can vary pretty drastically, from user interaction to server log analysis. The event will have more than 30 available challenges, grouped into easy, intermediate, and hard, for competitors to find and upload solutions for.

For each challenge, competitors will be given a problem description, a sample data set, and an expected output to make the desired order and formatting clear. Competitors are expected to generate more test data of their own and thoroughly verify the correctness of their code against all the corner cases they can think of; solutions tested against only the sample data provided will likely fail the challenge. Uploaded code is run in a sandboxed Docker container and its output tested for correctness.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments



Source: Ars Technica – Solve coding challenges at Runcode.ninja online competition, Nov. 6-9

Sabrent Rocket Nano Rugged IP67 Portable SSD Review: NVMe in a M.2 2242 Enclosure

Portable bus-powered SSDs are a growing segment of the direct-attached storage market. The ongoing glut in flash memory (and the growing confidence of flash vendors in QLC) has brought down the price of these drives. Sabrent, a computer peripherals and accessories manufacturer, has made a name for itself in the space by catering to niche segments such as ultra-high capacity and compact SSDs. The company sent over a bunch of unique external SSDs to put through our strenuous review process. The first product we are going to take a look at is the Rocket Nano Rugged 2TB USB 3.2 Gen 2 drive. Read on to find out how it stacks against the rest of the competition.



Source: AnandTech – Sabrent Rocket Nano Rugged IP67 Portable SSD Review: NVMe in a M.2 2242 Enclosure

Monster Mash: These are the best new horror movies to binge this Halloween

Tesla is now beta-testing self-driving software on public roads

Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments



Source: Ars Technica – Tesla is now beta-testing self-driving software on public roads

The Morning After: Netflix price hike takes HD streaming to $14 per month

It’s hard to remember now, but when Netflix first offered streaming as a standalone subscription back in 2011, it cost just $8 per month. Now the company’s latest price increase pushes that Standard streaming rate in the US to $14. If you already hav…

Source: Engadget – The Morning After: Netflix price hike takes HD streaming to per month

Rocket Report: SpaceX hits the century mark, Vote for Atlas V on Election Day

Photograph of a rocket just after liftoff on a cloudy day.

Enlarge / The “In Focus” mission takes to the skies this week. (credit: Rocket Lab)

Welcome to Edition 3.22 of the Rocket Report! After a spate of recent scrubs, the Cape gets down to business in the coming week with back-to-back government launches, one by United Launch Alliance and the other by SpaceX. Fingers (and toes) are crossed.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Rocket Lab orbits its 15th mission. Rocket Lab successfully launched its 15th Electron mission and deployed Earth-imaging satellites for Planet and Spaceflight Inc. customer Canon Electronics, the company said. The “In Focus” mission launched from Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 on New Zealand’s Māhia Peninsula at 21:21 UTC Wednesday.

Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments



Source: Ars Technica – Rocket Report: SpaceX hits the century mark, Vote for Atlas V on Election Day

SmartThings Find app can track down lost Samsung Galaxy devices

Smartphones and other devices are so intertwined with our lives that losing one can be traumatic. To that end, Samsung has unveiled SmartThings Find, an app that uses a variety of technologies to locate your phone, even if there’s no cell or WiFi sig…

Source: Engadget – SmartThings Find app can track down lost Samsung Galaxy devices

PlayStation CEO Says VR Won't Be a 'Meaningful' Part of Gaming For Years

Sony PlayStation CEO Jim Ryan says virtual reality won’t be a meaningful part of interactive entertainment in the near future. The Verge reports: Ryan indicated to The Washington Post that VR still has a long way to go, although he emphasized that Sony isn’t giving up on the medium. The statement suggests that an update to Sony’s PlayStation VR headset is years away.

“I think we’re more than a few minutes from the future of VR,” Ryan told the Post. “PlayStation believes in VR. Sony believes in VR, and we definitely believe at some point in the future, VR will represent a meaningful component of interactive entertainment. Will it be this year? No. Will it be next year? No. But will it come at some stage? We believe that.” He notes that the upcoming PlayStation 5, which will be released November 12th, supports the old PlayStation VR headset with a special adapter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – PlayStation CEO Says VR Won’t Be a ‘Meaningful’ Part of Gaming For Years

New 'Star Wars: Tales from the Galaxy's Edge' trailer reveals its story

Lucasfilm’s immersive entertainment studio ILMxLAB has released a new trailer for Star Wars: Tales from the Galaxy’s Edge, and it gives us a glimpse of the kind of adventures we can expect from Ady Sun’Zee. It shows the young Padawan exploring a myst…

Source: Engadget – New ‘Star Wars: Tales from the Galaxy’s Edge’ trailer reveals its story

Humans Have Been Living In Space For 20 Years Straight

Since 2000, there have always been humans living and working on the International Space Station — and the streak could just be getting started. National Geographic reports: On Halloween in the year 2000, a Russian Soyuz rocket launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and flew into the history books, carrying one U.S. astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts to the nascent International Space Station (ISS). The crew arrived two days later, and the space station has been continuously occupied by humans ever since, a 20-year streak of living and working in low-Earth orbit. “There’s kids now who are in college who, for their entire lives, we’ve been living off the planet,” says Kenny Todd, NASA’s deputy program manager for the ISS. “When I was a kid, that was all stuff that was just dreams.”

The orbiting laboratory is among the most expensive and technologically complex objects ever built: a $150-billion pressurized habitat as long as a football field, whizzing 254 miles above Earth’s surface at 17,000 miles an hour. Over the decades, 241 women and men from around the world have temporarily called the space station home, some for nearly a full year at a time. “It’s pretty crazy — I’m surprised we haven’t, like, really seriously hurt anybody,” says retired NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a year on one ISS stay. “It’s really a testament to the seriousness [with which] people on the ground take this job, the attention to detail.”

Upward of a hundred thousand people have worked together to design, build, launch, and operate the sprawling station, says David Nixon, who worked with NASA on ISS designs in the mid-1980s. “When you compare the station to the procession of great structures and buildings built by humanity since the dawn of civilization, it’s up there with the Pyramids, the Acropolis — all the great structures and edifices,” he says. The future of the ISS remains uncertain. “The station is currently slated to run until at least 2024, and much of its hardware is certified to operate safely until at least 2028, if not longer for its younger components,” the report notes.

“Will the ISS be disassembled and scavenged in orbit to construct a future space station? Will it be turned over to private companies as nations venture farther into space? Will the whole structure go out in a final blaze of glory, steered into a Pacific crash landing like the Russian space station Mir?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Humans Have Been Living In Space For 20 Years Straight

PlayStation CEO thinks VR's bright future is still years away

Sony offering PSVR owners a free camera adapter to use with the PS5 pretty much tells you that the company has no plans to release a new virtual reality headset anytime soon. Now, Sony Interactive Entertainment CEO Jim Ryan has confirmed to The Washi…

Source: Engadget – PlayStation CEO thinks VR’s bright future is still years away

Author Behind Bogus Hunter Biden Report Isn't Real Either

As if this Hunter Biden smear campaign couldn’t be more
clearly manufactured, Martin Aspen, the author behind a viral phony “intelligence”
document about the Vice President’s son that made it to Trump’s
inner circle, is not the Swiss security analyst he claims to be. Namely because
Martin Aspen doesn’t exist. Even his…

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Author Behind Bogus Hunter Biden Report Isn’t Real Either

'Sleeping Giant' Arctic Methane Deposits Starting To Release, Scientists Find

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Scientists have found evidence that frozen methane deposits in the Arctic Ocean — known as the “sleeping giants of the carbon cycle” — have started to be released over a large area of the continental slope off the East Siberian coast, the Guardian can reveal. High levels of the potent greenhouse gas have been detected down to a depth of 350 meters in the Laptev Sea near Russia, prompting concern among researchers that a new climate feedback loop may have been triggered that could accelerate the pace of global heating.

The slope sediments in the Arctic contain a huge quantity of frozen methane and other gases — known as hydrates. Methane has a warming effect 80 times stronger than carbon dioxide over 20 years. The United States Geological Survey has previously listed Arctic hydrate destabilization as one of four most serious scenarios for abrupt climate change. The international team onboard the Russian research ship R/V Akademik Keldysh said most of the bubbles were currently dissolving in the water but methane levels at the surface were four to eight times what would normally be expected and this was venting into the atmosphere. The scientists — who are part of a multi-year International Shelf Study Expedition — stressed their findings were preliminary. The scale of methane releases will not be confirmed until they return, analyze the data and have their studies published in a peer-reviewed journal. But the discovery of potentially destabilized slope frozen methane raises concerns that a new tipping point has been reached that could increase the speed of global heating.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – ‘Sleeping Giant’ Arctic Methane Deposits Starting To Release, Scientists Find

YouTube Music finally lets users filter out liked YouTube videos

The forced transition from Google Play Music to YouTube Music is upon us, and for those making the switch, one annoying aspect of the new service has been how it blends random videos from YouTube in with music. As far as YouTube Music is concerned, l…

Source: Engadget – YouTube Music finally lets users filter out liked YouTube videos

Facebook Is Losing Users In the US and Canada

User growth in the United States in Canada — the company’s most lucrative ad market — has declined, Facebook reported as part of its third-quarter earnings. Engadget reports: The company now has 196 million users in North America, down slightly from 198 million last quarter. In a statement, the company said the decrease was expected, and could continue through the end of the year. “As expected, in the third quarter of 2020, we saw Facebook DAUs and MAUs in the US & Canada decline slightly from the second quarter 2020 levels which were elevated due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Facebook wrote in a press release. “In the fourth quarter of 2020, we expect this trend to continue and that the number of DAUs and MAUs in the US & Canada will be flat or slightly down compared to the third quarter of 2020.”

The company had previously reported a large surge in growth at the start of the year due to widespread coronavirus lockdowns. Facebook isn’t seeing the same slowdown everywhere, though, and the social network is continuing to add new users in Asia and its “rest of world” markets. The company also continued to tout its “family of apps” metrics, which combines Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger. That number rose to 2.54 billion “daily active people” in September, according to the company. The slowdown also doesn’t seem to have affected Facebook’s revenue, which was up to $21.4 billion for the quarter, an increase of 22 percent from last year and better than analyst expectations for the company.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Facebook Is Losing Users In the US and Canada

Google's AI Converts Webpages Into Videos

Researchers at Google say they’ve developing an AI system that can automatically convert webpages into short videos. From a report: It extracts assets like text and images and their design styles including fonts, colors, and graphical layouts from HTML sources and organizes the assets into a sequence of shots, maintaining a look and feel similar to the source page as it does so. Google envisions the system could be useful to businesses that host websites containing rich visual representations about their services or products. These assets, the company says, could be repurposed for videos, potentially enabling those without extensive resources to reach a broader audience. A typical video costs between $880 and $1,200 and can take days to weeks to produce. URL2Video, which was presented at the 2020 User Interface Software and Technology Symposium, automatically selects key content from a page and decides the temporal and visual presentation of each asset.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Google’s AI Converts Webpages Into Videos

Instagram drops 'recent' posts from hashtag pages ahead of the election

Instagram is taking a new step to prevent the spread of misinformation ahead of the presidential election. The app is temporarily disabling “recent” posts from appearing on hashtag pages in order “to reduce the real-time spread of potentially harmful…

Source: Engadget – Instagram drops ‘recent’ posts from hashtag pages ahead of the election

Brave Browser First To Nix CNAME Deception

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Register: The Brave web browser will soon block CNAME cloaking, a technique used by online marketers to defy privacy controls designed to prevent the use of third-party cookies. The browser security model makes a distinction between first-party domains — those being visited — and third-party domains — from the suppliers of things like image assets or tracking code, to the visited site. Many of the online privacy abuses over the years have come from third-party resources like scripts and cookies, which is why third-party cookies are now blocked by default in Brave, Firefox, Safari, and Tor Browser.

In a blog post on Tuesday, Anton Lazarev, research engineer at Brave Software, and senior privacy researcher Peter Snyder, explain that online tracking scripts may use canonical name DNS records, known as CNAMEs, to make associated third-party tracking domains look like they’re part of the first-party websites actually being visited. They point to the site https://mathon.fr/ as an example, noting that without CNAME uncloaking, Brave blocks six requests for tracking scripts served by ad companies like Google, Facebook, Criteo, Sirdan, and Trustpilot. But the page also makes four requests via a script hosted at a randomized path under the first-party subdomain 16ao.mathon.fr. When Brave 1.17 ships next month (currently available as a developer build), it will be able to uncloak the CNAME deception and block the Eulerian script. Other browser vendors are planning related defenses. “Mozilla has been working on a fix in Firefox since last November,” notes The Register. “And in August, Apple’s Safari WebKit team proposed a way to prevent CNAME cloaking from being used to bypass the seven-day cookie lifetime imposed by WebKit’s Intelligent Tracking Protection system.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Brave Browser First To Nix CNAME Deception

Two Ohio Republicans Plead Guilty in Alleged $60 Million Bribery Scandal for Coal and Nuclear Bailout

Two of the five Republicans arrested on corruption charges involving former Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder pleaded guilty on Thursday to racketeering. They’re the first to be convicted in the alleged $60 million federal corruption scandal, which federal prosecutors are already calling one of the largest…

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Two Ohio Republicans Plead Guilty in Alleged Million Bribery Scandal for Coal and Nuclear Bailout