PolarFire SoC board has GbE port and 40-pin GPIO

Sundance will soon launch an SBC-like, $995 “PolarBerry” module that runs Linux on Microchip’s FPGA-enabled, RISC-V based PolarFire SoC with 4GB DDR4 and eMMC, dual CAN, a GbE port, and RPi style 40-pin GPIO. Microchip’s PolarFire SoC, the world’s first SoC to combine a Linux-ready RISC-V architecture CPU with an FPGA, has so far appeared […]

Source: LXer – PolarFire SoC board has GbE port and 40-pin GPIO

The Howff 3D scanning rig| The MagPi 99

How do you create a 3D model of a historic graveyard? With eight Raspberry Pi computers, as Rob Zwetsloot discovers in the latest issue of The MagPi magazine, out now.

The software builds up the 3D model of the graveyard

“In the city centre of Dundee is a historical burial ground, The Howff,” says Daniel Muirhead. We should probably clarify that he’s a 3D artist. “This old graveyard is densely packed with around 1500 gravestones and other funerary monuments, which happens to make it an excellent technical challenge for photogrammetry photo capture.”

This architecture, stone paths, and vibrant flora is why Daniel ended up creating a 3D-scanning rig out of eight Raspberry Pi computers. And the results are quite stunning.

Eight Raspberry Pi computers are mounted to the ball, with cameras pointing towards the ground

“The goal of this project was to capture photos for use in generating a 3D model of the ground,” he continues. “That model will be used as a base for attaching individual gravestone models and eventually building up a full composite model of this complex subject. The ground model will also be purposed for rendering an ultra-high-resolution map of the graveyard. The historical graveyard has a very active community group that are engaged in its study and digitisation, the Dundee Howff Conservation Group, so I will be sharing my digital outputs with them.”

Google graveyard

There are thousands of pictures, like this one, being used to create the model

To move the rig throughout the graveyard, Daniel used himself as the major moving part. With the eight Raspberry Pi cameras taking a photo every two seconds, he was able to capture over 180,000 photos over 13 hours of capture sessions.

“The rig was held above my head and the cameras were angled in such a way as to occlude me from view, so I was not captured in the photographs which instead were focused on the ground,” he explains. “Of the eight cameras, four were the regular model with 53.5 ° horizontal field of view (FoV), and the other four were a wide-angle model with 120 ° FoV. These were arranged on the rig pointing outwards in eight different directions, alternating regular and wide-angle, all angled at a similar pitch down towards the ground. During capture, the rig was rotated by +45 ° for every second position, so that the wide-angles were facing where the regulars had been facing on the previous capture, and vice versa.”
Daniel worked according to a very specific grid pattern, staying in one spot for five seconds at a time, with the hopes that at the end he’d have every patch of ground photographed from 16 different positions and angles.

Maker Daniel Muirhead is a 3D artist with an interest in historical architecture

“With a lot of photo data to scan through for something fairly complex, we wondered how well the system had worked. Daniel tells us the only problems he had were with some bug fixing on his code: “The images were separated into batches of around 10,000 (1250 photos from each of the eight cameras), plugged into the photogrammetry software, and the software had no problem in reconstructing the ground as a 3D model.”

Accessible 3D surveying

He’s now working towards making it accessible and low-cost to others that might want it. “Low-cost in the triple sense of financial, labour, and time,” he clarifies. “I have logged around 8000 hours in a variety of photogrammetry softwares, in the process capturing over 300,000 photos with a regular camera for use in such files, so I have some experience in this area.”

“With the current state of technology, it should be possible with around £1000 in equipment to perform a terrestrial photo-survey of a town centre in under an hour, then with a combined total of maybe three hours’ manual processing and 20 hours’ automated computer processing, generate a high-quality 3D model, the total production time being under 24 hours. It should be entirely plausible for a local community group to use such a method to perform weekly (or at least monthly) 3D snapshots of their town centre.”

The MagPi issue 99 – Out now

The MagPi magazine is out now, available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press onlinestore, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the PDF directly from the MagPi magazine website.

The post The Howff 3D scanning rig| The MagPi 99 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – The Howff 3D scanning rig| The MagPi 99

Mesa 20.3 Lands Rewritten AMD Zen L3 Cache Optimization

You may recall going back to 2018 that well known open-source AMD Mesa driver developer Marek Olsak was working on Mesa optimizations around the AMD Zen architecture. In particular, better handling of Mesa for Zen’s L3 cache design. A rewritten implementation of that has now landed along with some other improvements…

Source: Phoronix – Mesa 20.3 Lands Rewritten AMD Zen L3 Cache Optimization

Oracle Continues Building DTrace For Linux Atop BPF

More than a decade ago Linux users tended to be envious of Sun Microsystems’ Solaris for ZFS and DTrace as the two most interesting technical selling points of the platform. In that time OpenZFS is now extremely vibrant for offering ZFS on BSD and Linux systems while DTrace is barely brought up these days. This tracing framework originally developed for Solaris was fantastic back in the day but over the years Linux has stepped up its game with various efforts. Now as we hit the end of 2020, Oracle engineers continue working on bringing better DTrace support to Linux…

Source: Phoronix – Oracle Continues Building DTrace For Linux Atop BPF

Whiskey Lake embedded PC has dual hot-swap SATA

Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “eBOX630-528-FL” runs Linux or Win 10 on Intel’s 8th Gen UE-series with up to 32GB DDR4, 2x hot-swap SATA bays, 3x GbE, 6x USB, 4x COM, 2x HDMI, and 2x mini-PCIe. The eBOX630-528-FL may be the quintessential, mid-range Intel-based embedded PC of 2020. With a 15W TDP 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE processor […]

Source: LXer – Whiskey Lake embedded PC has dual hot-swap SATA

Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4

StereoPi is going to Crowd Supply to pitch an open-spec “StereoPi v2” stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi CM4. The v2 adds a Type-C port and advances to GbE and 802.11ac. In Dec. 2019, Russia-based Virt2real found Crowd Supply success with a StereoPi stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi […]

Source: LXer – Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4

Linux 5.11 To Land Optimization That Helps IO_uring Performance

At the start of October we mentioned a kernel optimization that can help IO_uring performance. Now as we approach the end of the month, Linux 5.11 is poised to land the optimization that especially helps out with threaded workloads…

Source: Phoronix – Linux 5.11 To Land Optimization That Helps IO_uring Performance

5 new sudo features you need to know in 2020

When you want to perform an action on a POSIX system, one of the safest ways to do so is to use the sudo command. Unlike logging in as the root user and performing what could be a dangerous action, sudo grants any user designated as a “sudoer”  by the sysadmin temporary permission to perform a normally restricted activity.

Source: LXer – 5 new sudo features you need to know in 2020

Program in Arm6 assembly language on a Raspberry Pi

The Arm website touts the processor[he]#039[/he]s underlying architecture as “the keystone of the world[he]#039[/he]s largest compute ecosystem,” which is plausible given the number of handheld and embedded devices with Arm processors. Arm processors are prevalent in the Internet of Things (IoT), but they are also used in desktop machines, servers, and even high-performance computers, such as the Fugaku HPC. But why look at Arm machines through the lens of assembly language?

Source: LXer – Program in Arm6 assembly language on a Raspberry Pi

It's Now Even Easier Setting Up Windows Subsystem For Linux On Windows 10

When Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) initially debuted there were a few different steps that needed to be carried out for setting up this Linux binary compatibility layer atop Windows. But now with the latest Windows 10 Insider Preview builds it’s becoming increasingly trivial to get going with WSL…

Source: Phoronix – It’s Now Even Easier Setting Up Windows Subsystem For Linux On Windows 10