Facebook Is Reportedly Under Investigation for 'Systemic' Racial Bias in Its Workplace

Facebook’s hiring practices and promotions are under federal scrutiny following reports of widespread racial bias, according to Reuters. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has launched a “systemic” investigation into the social media giant, indicating that it suspects internal policies may be contributing to…

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Source: Gizmodo – Facebook Is Reportedly Under Investigation for ‘Systemic’ Racial Bias in Its Workplace

The One-Week Hijacking of Perl.com – Explained

“For a week we lost control of the Perl.com domain,” a long-running site offering news and articles about the programming language, writes the site’s senior editor, brian d foy.

“Now that the incident has died down, we can explain some of what happened and how we handled it.”
This incident only affected the domain ownership of Perl.com and there was no other compromise of community resources. This website was still there, but DNS was handing out different IP numbers…

Recovering the domain wasn’t the end of the response though. While the domain was compromised, various security products had blacklisted Perl.com and some DNS servers had sinkholed it. We figured that would naturally work itself out, so we didn’t immediately celebrate the return of Perl.com. We wanted it to be back for everyone. And, I think we’re fully back. However, if you have problems with the domain, please raise an issue so we at least know it’s not working for part of the internet.

What we think happened

This part veers into some speculation, and Perl.com wasn’t the only victim. We think that there was a social engineering attack on Network Solutions, including phony documents and so on. There’s no reason for Network Solutions to reveal anything to me (again, I’m not the injured party), but I did talk to other domain owners involved and this is the basic scheme they reported. John Berryhill provided some forensic work in Twitter that showed the compromise actually happened in September. The domain was transferred to the BizCN registrar in December, but the nameservers were not changed. The domain was transferred again in January to another registrar, Key Systems, GmbH. This latency period avoids immediate detection, and bouncing the domain through a couple registrars makes the recovery much harder…

Once transferred to Key Systems in late January, the new, fraudulent registrant listed the domain (along with others), on Afternic (a domain marketplace). If you had $190,000, you could have bought Perl.com. This was quickly de-listed after the The Register made inquiries.

“I think we were very fortunate here and that many people with a soft spot in their hearts for Perl did a lot of good work for us,” the article notes. “All sides understood that Perl.com belonged to Tom and it was a simple matter of work to resolve it. A relatively unknown domain name might not fare as well in proving they own it…”

But again, the incident ended happily, foy writes, and “The Perl.com domain is back in the hands of Tom Christiansen and we’re working on the various security updates so this doesn’t happen again. The website is back to how it was and slightly shinier for the help we received.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – The One-Week Hijacking of Perl.com – Explained

Sonos' Roam can reportedly pass music to other speakers

More details of Sonos’ portable Roam speaker are dribbling out, and they suggest there will be more to draw you in besides the size and price. The Verge claims the Roam will include a few advantages over the larger Move, most notably "Sound…

Source: Engadget – Sonos’ Roam can reportedly pass music to other speakers

America's Air Force Is Having To Reverse Engineer Parts of Its Own Stealth Bomber

Long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo shares a report from The Drive:

In a surprising turn of events, the United States government is calling upon its country’s industry to reverse engineer components for the Air Force’s B-2 Spirit stealth bomber. An official call for this highly unusual kind of assistance was put out today on the U.S. government’s contracting website beta.SAM.gov. Mark Thompson, a national-security analyst at the Project On Government Oversight, brought our attention to the notice, which seeks an engineering effort that will reverse engineer key parts for the B-2’s Load Heat Exchangers. While it is not exactly clear what part of the aircraft’s many complex and exotic subsystems these heat exchangers relate to, the bomber has no shortage of avionics systems, for example, which could require cooling…

While it’s hard to say exactly why this approach is being taken now, it indicates that the original plans for these components are unavailable or the manufacturing processes and tooling used to produce them no longer exists… Indeed, as the average age of the Air Force fleet continues to increase, there are only likely to be more such requirements for parts that are long out of production. Before he stood down, the former Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, Will Roper, told Air Force Magazine of his desire for a “digital representation of every part in the Air Force inventory….”

All in all, the search for reverse-engineered components for the B-2 fleet is keeping with the Air Force’s current trend of moving toward the latest digital engineering and manufacturing techniques to help ensure its aircraft can be sustained not just easier and more cheaply, but in some cases, possibly at all.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – America’s Air Force Is Having To Reverse Engineer Parts of Its Own Stealth Bomber

KDE Plasma 5.22 Adds Adaptive Opacity + Will Avoid Useless Rendering When Screen Is Off

KDE developers have been off to a busy March so far with working on adaptive panel opacity support for Plasma 5.22. Another pleasant improvement with that next Plasma release is to avoid rendering work when the screen is off…

Source: Phoronix – KDE Plasma 5.22 Adds Adaptive Opacity + Will Avoid Useless Rendering When Screen Is Off

Intel 11th Gen Tiger Lake-H45 Specs Allegedly Confirmed Via OEM Leak

Intel 11th Gen Tiger Lake-H45 Specs Allegedly Confirmed Via OEM Leak
Last weekend, we brought you some new information on Tiger Lake-H45 processors on the way from Intel. These mobile processors feature a maximum TDP of 45 watts, allowing them to hit higher clock speeds and offer more core/threads than their Tiger Lake-U and Tiger Lake-H35 counterparts.
We’ve now come across specs for three Tiger Lake-H45

Source: Hot Hardware – Intel 11th Gen Tiger Lake-H45 Specs Allegedly Confirmed Via OEM Leak

What is 'Grief Debt' and How Can We Get Rid of It?

As we’ve become all too familiar with over the past year, grief isn’t limited to losing a loved one (although that is its own, particularly painful type of grief). Whether it’s losing a job, not getting to see family and friends for extended periods of time, or simply mourning our pre-pandemic lives, we still have no…

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Source: LifeHacker – What is ‘Grief Debt’ and How Can We Get Rid of It?

Genshin Impact's 1.4 Update Comes Out March 17, Adds A New Character And Mini-Games

Genshin Impact’s next big update releases on March 17 and with it comes the start of a new event, the Windblume Festival, bringing new mini-games, a new playable character, the opportunity to go on dates with select characters, and some quality of life changes.

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Source: Kotaku – Genshin Impact’s 1.4 Update Comes Out March 17, Adds A New Character And Mini-Games

A New Motherboard For Amiga, The Platform That Refuses To Die

Hackaday writes:

In the early years of personal computing there were a slew of serious contenders. A PC, a Mac, an Atari ST, an Amiga, and several more that all demanded serious consideration on the general purpose desktop computer market. Of all these platforms, the Amiga somehow stubbornly refuses to die. The Amiga 1200+ from [Jeroen Vandezande] is the latest in a long procession of post-Commodore Amigas, and as its name suggests it provides an upgrade for the popular early-1990s all-in-one Amiga model.

It takes the form of a well-executed open-source printed circuit board that’s a drop-in replacement for the original A1200 motherboard… The catch: it does require all the custom Amiga chips from a donor board…

It’s fair to say that this is the Amiga upgrade we’d all have loved to see in about 1996 rather than waiting until 2019.
Mike Bouma (Slashdot reader #85,252) shares a recent video showing the latest update of AmigaOS 4 by Hyperion Entertainment, and reminds us of two “also active” Amiga OS clones — AROS and MorphOS.

Further reading: Little Things That Made Amiga Great.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – A New Motherboard For Amiga, The Platform That Refuses To Die

FedEx plans for an all-electric delivery fleet by 2040

FedEx will replace its current delivery trucks with electric models until its entire fleet is made up of zero—emission vehicles by 2040. The company is making the transition as a way to help it achieve its goal to reach carbon neutral status in the s…

Source: Engadget – FedEx plans for an all-electric delivery fleet by 2040

Biostar Announces First Radeon RX 6700 XT Factory Overclocked Gaming Card

Biostar Announces First Radeon RX 6700 XT Factory Overclocked Gaming Card
After months of rumors and speculation, and then an accidental slip-up by AMD itself, the company finally announced the Radeon RX 6700 XT on Wednesday. The new GPU comes with a cut-down version of Big Navi, dubbed Navi 22 (not-so Big Navi?), which has 40 compute units with 12 GB of 192-bit GDDR6 VRAM. AMD targets 1440p with maximum settings

Source: Hot Hardware – Biostar Announces First Radeon RX 6700 XT Factory Overclocked Gaming Card

How CRISPR Can Create More Ethical Eggs

Slashdot reader wooloohoo shares a new article from Cornell’s Alliance for Science, a group who gives its mission as correcting misinformation and countering conspiracy theories slowing progress on issues including synthetic biology and agricultural innovations:

There are two types of chickens: the broilers that we eat and the layers that produce the eggs. The layers don’t have enough meat to make them useful for human consumption and since only hens can lay eggs, that leaves the male layers useless. As a result, billions of newly hatched male layer chicks are killed each year.

Now the Israeli ag-tech startup eggXYt has found a way to humanely address this dilemma through the use of CRISPR — the gene editing technique that allows scientists to make targeted, specific genetic tweaks…

By using CRISPR, eggXYt’s scientists can edit the genes of chickens to make them lay sex-detectable eggs… The global egg industry saves the costs and the ethical conundrum of killing half of its product and billions of additional eggs are added to the global market to help meet growing demand.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – How CRISPR Can Create More Ethical Eggs

Must-See Tom Cruise Deepfakes Are A Wakeup Call To The Dangers Of AI Image Manipulation

Must-See Tom Cruise Deepfakes Are A Wakeup Call To The Dangers Of AI Image Manipulation
When there is enough footage of someone floating around from movies and other media, there is a very real possibility of making an AI-generated version of them, or a “deepfake.”  We saw this earlier last year with a Back To The Future deepfake with Robert Downey Jr. and Tom Holland rather than real Doc and Marty. Now, deepfaker and visual

Source: Hot Hardware – Must-See Tom Cruise Deepfakes Are A Wakeup Call To The Dangers Of AI Image Manipulation

Tesla will dramatically expand its Full Self-Driving beta

Now might be your chance to join Tesla’s Full Self-Driving beta. Elon Musk has revealed that Tesla’s new 8.2 software is "doubling" the size of the beta test program, and 8.3 will "probably" expand the size of the program…

Source: Engadget – Tesla will dramatically expand its Full Self-Driving beta

ICYMI: We review Samsung’s improved Galaxy Chromebook 2

This week we got our hands on Samsung’s new Galaxy Chromebook 2, and Nathan Ingraham details the ways that the new model makes significant improvements over last year’s laptop. Also, Steve Dent takes another look at the Canon EOS R5 to see how fi…

Source: Engadget – ICYMI: We review Samsung’s improved Galaxy Chromebook 2

Can Users Poison the Data Big Tech Uses to Surveil Them?

“Algorithms are meaningless without good data. The public can exploit that to demand change,” argues a new article in MIT’s Technology Review (shared by long-time Slashdot reader mspohr):

Data is fed into machine-learning algorithms to target you with ads and recommendations. Google cashes your data in for over $120 billion a year of ad revenue. Increasingly, we can no longer opt out of this arrangement… Now researchers at Northwestern University are suggesting new ways to redress this power imbalance by treating our collective data as a bargaining chip…

In a new paper being presented at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency conference next week, researchers including PhD students Nicholas Vincent and Hanlin Li propose three ways the public can exploit this to their advantage:

Data strikes, inspired by the idea of labor strikes, which involve withholding or deleting your data so a tech firm cannot use it — leaving a platform or installing privacy tools, for instance.

Data poisoning, which involves contributing meaningless or harmful data. AdNauseam, for example, is a browser extension that clicks on every single ad served to you, thus confusing Google’s ad-targeting algorithms.

Conscious data contribution, which involves giving meaningful data to the competitor of a platform you want to protest, such as by uploading your Facebook photos to Tumblr instead.

Will we someday see “white-hat data poisoners” trying to convince tech companies that the best place to advertise is the classified sections of small local newspapers?

While the researchers believe sporadic individual actions have little impact, the article takes this to its ultimate conclusion. “What if millions of people were to coordinate to poison a tech giant’s data well…? That might just give them some leverage to assert their demands.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Can Users Poison the Data Big Tech Uses to Surveil Them?