You can watch the 'Fortnite' World Cup finals while playing 'Fortnite'

Are you such a big Fortnite fan that you can’t bear the thought of having to stop playing to watch the Fortnite World Cup finals? You’re in luck. Epic Games has introduced picture-in-picture streaming as part of the game’s 9.41 update, giving you a…

Source: Engadget – You can watch the ‘Fortnite’ World Cup finals while playing ‘Fortnite’

What to Expect From Round Two of the Democratic Presidential Debates

The second round of Democratic debates are just a week away, with 10 presidential hopefuls set to appear on stage in Detroit on two separate nights—and the stakes are higher than ever. Come September, the candidates will have to have 130,000 unique donors and at least 2% of support in four polls to qualify for the next

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Source: LifeHacker – What to Expect From Round Two of the Democratic Presidential Debates

Researchers develop modular bots that combine to form a single flexible machine

The idea of small robots teaming up to form one giant robot is commonplace in sci-fi shows like Voltron, and researchers are seeking ways to make that a reality. Now, modular robots have just become more intelligent, thanks to a project at ModLab at…

Source: Engadget – Researchers develop modular bots that combine to form a single flexible machine

Todd McFarlane Has a Really Wild Idea to Get Spawn Made

Quentin Tarantino gives updates on Kill Bill’s next installment and his confusion over the Star Trek timelines. News from the ever-expanding Walking Dead TV universe. Plus some news from CW-land including intriguing updates on the Crisis on Infite Earths crossover event. Spoilers, whoaaaaa!

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Source: io9 – Todd McFarlane Has a Really Wild Idea to Get Spawn Made

Square offers sellers $10 photoshoots for their products

If a picture really is worth a thousand words, then great product photography needs to be at the top of the agenda for anyone selling stuff on Etsy, eBay, Kickstarter or basically anywhere online. Sometimes, though, shooting on your iPhone just doesn…

Source: Engadget – Square offers sellers photoshoots for their products

Nvidia RTX 2080 Super hands-on: The result when AMD is out of striking distance

Earlier this month, Nvidia kicked a stool out from under AMD’s feet, just as the graphics-card sector began heating up anew. AMD was set to land a serious blow with new RX 5700 cards in the “pricey but reasonable” range—a range that Nvidia had failed to capture with its “entry-level” RTX cards, the 2060 and 2070. Nvidia responded to AMD’s news by unveiling and launching a surprise pair of solid “Super” cards. AMD responded with its own price cut (and a claim that this price-war dance was its plan all along).

As these similarly specced cards jostled for the “$400ish” crown, the winner was ultimately consumers. At every price point, new GPU buyers can expect a solid bang-for-buck quotient between the $349 AMD Radeon RX 5700 and the $499 Nvidia RTX 2070 Super.

Weeks later, we have Nvidia’s third Super-branded launch, the RTX 2080 Super. And it’s a good reminder of what happens when AMD is not in striking distance of a particular price sector.

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Source: Ars Technica – Nvidia RTX 2080 Super hands-on: The result when AMD is out of striking distance

MicroLED Displays Could Show Up In Products As Soon As 2020

An anonymous reader quotes a report IEEE Spectrum: One of the most striking things about the prototype microLED display that Silicon Valley startup Mojo Vision unveiled in June was its size. At half a millimeter across, it’s barely bigger than a single pixel from the microLED TV prototype Samsung showed off in 2018. That both use versions of the same technology is remarkable, and it portends big potential for screens made of superefficient and bright micrometer-scale gallium nitride LEDs. Impressive prototypes have proliferated during the past year, and now that companies are turning to the hard work of scaling up their manufacturing processes, displays could appear in some products as soon as late next year. The driving force behind microLED displays remains a combination of brightness and efficiency that LCD and OLED technology can’t come close to. One demo of a smartwatch-size display by Silicon Valley — based Glo shines at 4,000 nits (candelas per square meter) while consuming less than 1 watt. An equivalent LCD display would burn out in seconds trying to meet half that brightness. Some companies “are making monolithic displays, where the gallium nitride pixels are made as a complete array on a chip and a separate silicon backplane controls those pixels,” the report says. Others “are using ‘pick and place’ technology to transfer individual LEDs or multi-microLED pixels into place on a thin-film-transistor (TFT) backplane. The former is suited to microdisplays for applications like augmented reality and head-up displays. The latter is a better fit for larger displays.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – MicroLED Displays Could Show Up In Products As Soon As 2020

The New Lego Ideas Treehouse Has Leaves Made Of Real Plants

Last year, the Lego Group started making flowers, trees, and shrubs out of plant-based polyethylene using sustainably sourced sugarcane. I can’t imagine a better use for all of those plant plastic parts than this beautiful, 14-inch-tall Lego Ideas Treehouse set.

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Source: Kotaku – The New Lego Ideas Treehouse Has Leaves Made Of Real Plants

Tetris Effect Looks Stunning On PC

Tetris Effect blends the world of visionary studio Enhance with the time-tested, near-perfect rules of Tetris for a euphoric sensory experience. I reviewed it last year for the PlayStation 4, and today, it’s finally out on PC. With enhanced visuals, it looks better than ever. Check out the video to see it for yourself…

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Source: Kotaku – Tetris Effect Looks Stunning On PC

The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: Memories of the Future

The last two months have been a period of tit-for-tat in the PC video card industry. Both AMD and NVIDIA have been going back and forth, making announcements and launching products as part of a broader restructuring of the mid-range and high-end video card markets in response to the launch of AMD’s Radeon RX 5700 series of video cards. Performance is going up while last-minute maneuvering has brought prices slightly down, all the while the two major players in the GPU space look to solidify their product lineups and secure their competitive edge against their competition.

For all practical purposes, NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 20 Super series has been the company’s response to AMD’s new video cards. A combination of a mid-generation kicker and a product stack realignment to go head-to-head with AMD, the Super cards have given NVIDIA’s product lineup a modest performance boost at almost every level. After launching the first two cards in this sub-series early this month with the GeForce RTX 2070 Super and GeForce RTX 2060 Super, NVIDIA is back again to launch the last (?) of the Super cards: the previously announced GeForce RTX 2080 Super.



Source: AnandTech – The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: Memories of the Future

How to Write a Glassdoor Job Review Without Giving Yourself Away

There are some jobs you just want to warn others about. Maybe you had a boss that micromanaged your every move, or your pay remained embarrassingly low despite your stellar work ethic. For any number of reasons, you may feel compelled to write a review and share your salary on one of the many online review sites like…

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Source: LifeHacker – How to Write a Glassdoor Job Review Without Giving Yourself Away

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: More Bang For The Buck

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: More Bang For The Buck
The final member of NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX Super-series officially arrives today, the GeForce RTX 2080 Super. In case you missed it, a couple of weeks back, NVIDIA launched the GeForce RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super, to preemptively zing AMD in the lead-up to the Radeon RX 5700 series launch. The GeForce RTX Super-series will supplant…

Source: Hot Hardware – NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Review: More Bang For The Buck

Introducing the Sometimes Misunderstood World of TikTok

You’ve probably heard of TikTok, but whether you know exactly what it is and entails could be very much its own question. As a social media app, TikTok has grown in popularity in recent years, with millions of users sharing short-form videos of themselves with visual effects and sound bites aplenty. If all of this […]

The post Introducing the Sometimes Misunderstood World of TikTok appeared first on TGDaily.



Source: TG Daily – Introducing the Sometimes Misunderstood World of TikTok

Apple is updating old iPhone and iPad models to fix a GPS issue

In addition to releasing iOS 12.4, Apple has also announced that it’s patching older versions of the platform for devices that can’t run the latest rollouts. We’re talking about models as old as the iPhone 4s and the first-generation iPad mini. Not t…

Source: Engadget – Apple is updating old iPhone and iPad models to fix a GPS issue

Bringing a book to life with Raspberry Pi | Hello World #9

Sian Wheatcroft created an interactive story display to enable children to explore her picture book This Bear, That Bear. She explains the project, and her current work in teaching, in the newest issue of Hello World magazine, available now.

The task of promoting my first children’s picture book, This Bear, That Bear, was a daunting one. At the time, I wasn’t a teacher and the thought of standing in front of assembly halls and classrooms sounded terrifying. As well as reading the book to the children, I wanted to make my events interactive using physical computing, showing a creative side to coding and enabling a story to come to life in a different way than what the children would typically see, i.e. animated retellings.

The plan

Coming from a tech-loving family, I naturally gravitated towards the Raspberry Pi, and found out about Bare Conductive and their PiCap. I first envisaged using their conductive paint on the canvas, enabling users to touch the paint to interact with the piece. It would be some sort of scene from the book, bringing some of the characters to life. I soon scrapped that idea, as I discovered that simply using copper tape on the back of the canvas was conductive enough, which also allowed me to add colour to the piece.

I enlisted the help of my two sons (two and five at the time) — they gladly supplied their voices to some of the bears and, my personal favourite on the canvas, the ghost. The final design features characters from the book — when children touch certain areas of the canvas, they hear the voices of the characters.

The back of the canvas, covered in copper tape

Getting the project up and running went pretty smoothly. I do regret making the piece so large, though, as it proved difficult to transport across the country, especially on the busy London Underground!

Interactivity and props

The project added a whole other layer to the events I was taking part in. In schools, I would read the book and have props for the children to wear, allowing them to act out the book as I read aloud. The canvas then added further interaction, and it surprised me how excited the children were about it. They were also really curious and wanted to know how it worked. I enjoyed showing them the back of the canvas with all its copper tape and crocodile clips. They were amazed by the fact it was all run on the Raspberry Pi — such a tiny computer!

The front of the interactive canvas

Fast-forward a few years, and I now find myself in the classroom full-time as a newly qualified teacher. The canvas has recently moved out of the classroom cupboard into my newly developed makerspace, in the hope of a future project being born.

I teach in Year 3, so coding in Python or using the command line on Raspbian may be a little beyond my students. However, I have a keen interest in project-based learning and am hoping to incorporate a host of cross-curricular activities with my students involving the canvas.

I hope to instil a love for digital making in my students and, in turn, show senior leaders what can be done with such equipment and projects.

A literacy project

This work really lends itself to a literacy project that other educators could try. Perhaps you’re reading a picture book or a more text-based piece: why not get the students to design the canvas using characters from the story? The project would also work equally well with foundation subjects like History or Science. Children could gather information onto the canvas, explaining how something works or how something happened. The age of the children would influence the level of involvement they had in the rest of the project’s creation. The back end could be pre-made — older children could help with the copper tape and wiring, while younger children could stop at the design process.

Part of the project is getting the children to create sounds to go with their design, enabling deeper thinking about a story or topic.

It’s about a collaborative process with the teacher and students, followed by the sharing of their creation with the broader school community.

Get Hello World magazine issue 9 for free

The brand-new issue of Hello World is available right now as a free PDF download from the Hello World website.

UK-based educators can also subscribe to receive Hello World as printed magazine FOR FREE, direct to their door. And those outside the UK, educator or not, can subscribe to receive free digital issues of Hello World in their inbox on the day of their release.

Head to helloworld.raspberrypi.org to sign up today!

The post Bringing a book to life with Raspberry Pi | Hello World #9 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – Bringing a book to life with Raspberry Pi | Hello World #9