How to create compressed encrypted archives with tar and gpg

There are many reasons why you may want to create compressed encrypted file archives. You may want to create an encrypted backup of your personal files. Another possible scenario is that you may want to privately share content with a friend or colleague over the web or through cloud storage. Tar.gz files, or compressed tarballs, are created using the tar command. These tarballs are pretty much the standard go-to format for archives on GNU/Linux, however they are not encrypted. In the above scenarios that we mentioned it is often desirable to have encryption in order to secure your data. This is where gpg comes in.

Source: LXer – How to create compressed encrypted archives with tar and gpg

[$] "Structural pattern matching" for Python, part 1

We last looked at the idea of a Python
“match” or “switch” statement back in 2016, but it is something that has
been circulating in the Python community both before and since that coverage.
In June it was raised again, with a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP)
supporting it: PEP 622
(“Structural Pattern Matching“). As that title would imply, the
match statement proposed in the PEP is actually a pattern-matching
construct with many uses.
While it may superficially resemble the C switch statement, a
Python match would do far more than simply choose a chunk of code
to execute based on the value of an expression.

Source: LWN.net – [$] “Structural pattern matching” for Python, part 1

LibreOffice 7.0 released

Version 7.0 of the LibreOffice office suite is out. It brings a long list
of new features, including: “support for OpenDocument Format (ODF) 1.3; Skia graphics engine and Vulkan
GPU-based acceleration for better performance; and carefully improved
compatibility with DOCX, XLSX and PPTX files
“. The plan to create a
differentiated “enterprise edition” that was discussed in July has been deferred and is not
part of this release.

Source: LWN.net – LibreOffice 7.0 released

Wrap it before you tap it? No, say Linux developers: 'GPL condom' for Nvidia driver is laughed out of the kernel

Facebook’s man told: ‘OK, now you are just trolling us’. Linux devs have dismissed a proposed patch to the kernel that would only work with a Nvidia driver, motivating a second patch that will prevent disguised use of proprietary code in GPL modules.…

Source: LXer – Wrap it before you tap it? No, say Linux developers: ‘GPL condom’ for Nvidia driver is laughed out of the kernel

Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Artwork by Sylvia Ritter Looks Astonishing, Made with Krita

Talented concept artist Sylvia Ritter continues the Ubuntu codename inspired artwork series and published today an astonishing artwork inspired by the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” operating system.

Source: LXer – Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Artwork by Sylvia Ritter Looks Astonishing, Made with Krita

Red Hat changes certification rules in response to the coronavirus pandemic

Unfortunately, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s harder than ever to take the tests you need to get or keep a certification. Red Hat, the Linux and cloud power, has an answer. Red Hat is extending your soon to expire certifications and has launched a new online certification testing program for its top four certifications.

Source: LXer – Red Hat changes certification rules in response to the coronavirus pandemic

Creating and debugging Linux dump files

Crash dump, memory dump, core dump, system dump … all produce the same outcome: a file containing the state of an application’s memory at a specific time—usually when the application crashes.Knowing how to deal with these files can help you find the root cause(s) of a failure. Even if you are not a developer, dump files created on your system can be very helpful (as well as approachable) in understanding software.This is a hands-on article, and can you follow along with the example by cloning the sample application repository with:read more

Source: LXer – Creating and debugging Linux dump files