Watch Live: SpaceX's Second Try to Launch NASA Astronauts to the Space Station

Bad weather stopped the much-anticipated countdown earlier this week, but SpaceX and NASA will try again today to launch a Crew Dragon to space with astronauts on board. You can catch the action live right here.

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Source: Gizmodo – Watch Live: SpaceX’s Second Try to Launch NASA Astronauts to the Space Station

Earth’s first off-world colonies will be built on soil

As Apollo astronauts trundled and trod awkwardly across the desolate lunar landscape, an insidious menace scuffed up their spacesuits. Moondust. Fine as talcum powder, sharp as glass and seemingly everywhere, these super-fine particles coated the ast…

Source: Engadget – Earth’s first off-world colonies will be built on soil

Recommended Reading: He bought StubHub right before the pandemic

Worst. Deal. Ever.Noah Kirsch, ForbesIn November, Eric Baker’s online ticket marketplace Viagogo purchased rival StubHub for $4 billion. Baker was actually one of StubHub’s co-founders before he was fired from the company. The deal closed in February…

Source: Engadget – Recommended Reading: He bought StubHub right before the pandemic

How to Watch the 'Lord of the Rings' Reunion

It’s going to be a beautiful summer weekend. (Maybe—we don’t know where you live.) We do know how tempting it’s going to be to get outside and see other people, but Josh Gad has other plans for you on Sunday. That’s when he’s turning the upcoming episode of his quarantine YouTube series, “Reunited Apart into a “Lord…

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Source: LifeHacker – How to Watch the ‘Lord of the Rings’ Reunion

The Morning After: Why would anyone buy a $350 'anti-5G' USB stick?

It’s normal for our weekend newsletter to recap some of the highlight stories posted earlier in the week. It’s a bit unusual for them to include one about Pablo Escobar’s brother trying to sell refurbished iPhone 11 Pros. Back on our usual beat, we’l…

Source: Engadget – The Morning After: Why would anyone buy a 0 ‘anti-5G’ USB stick?

Western Digital Gets Sued For Sneaking SMR Disks Into Its NAS Channel

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: All three of the surviving conventional hard drive vendors — Toshiba, Western Digital, and Seagate — have gotten caught sneaking disks featuring Shingled Magnetic Recording technology into unexpected places recently. But Western Digital has been the most brazen of the three, and it’s been singled out for a class action lawsuit in response. Although all three major manufacturers quietly added SMR disks to their desktop hard drive line-up, Western Digital is the only one so far to slip them into its NAS (Network Attached Storage) stack. NAS drives are expected to perform well in RAID and other multiple disk arrays, whether ZFS pools or consumer devices like Synology or Netgear NAS appliances.

Hattis Law has initiated a class action lawsuit against Western Digital, accordingly. The lawsuit alleges both that the SMR technology in the newer Western Digital Red drives is inappropriate for the marketed purpose of the drives and that Western Digital deliberately “deceived and harm[ed] consumers” in the course of doing so. Hattis’ position is strengthened by a series of tests that website ServeTheHome released yesterday. The results demonstrate that although Western Digital’s new 4TB Red “NAS” disk performed adequately as a desktop drive, it was unfit for purpose in a ZFS storage array (zpool).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Western Digital Gets Sued For Sneaking SMR Disks Into Its NAS Channel

Today’s the day—weather permitting, America is returning to space

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Source: Ars Technica – Today’s the day—weather permitting, America is returning to space

Udoo Bolt Gear mini-PC launches with Ryzen V1000 Udoo Bolt SBC

Seco has launched a $399 “Udoo Bolt Gear” mini-PC kit built around its Ryzen Embedded V1000 based Udoo Bolt SBC. The $399 kit includes a metal case, 65W adapter, and a WiFi/BT M.2 card. A growing number of open-spec, community-backed SBCs ship with optional. and in some cases, standard enclosures, but most of these are […]

Source: LXer – Udoo Bolt Gear mini-PC launches with Ryzen V1000 Udoo Bolt SBC

Everyone’s ordering delivery, but apps aren’t making money

Two Uber Eats delivery courier wait outside Mc Donalds fast food in Ghent, Belgium on May 14, 2020. As Belgium takes steps in easing Restrictions, Restaurant and cafe are not allowed to open to customers only fast food and take away is allowed. restaurants and restaurants may not reopen before June 8.  (Photo by Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Enlarge / Two Uber Eats delivery courier wait outside Mc Donalds fast food in Ghent, Belgium on May 14, 2020. As Belgium takes steps in easing Restrictions, Restaurant and cafe are not allowed to open to customers only fast food and take away is allowed. restaurants and restaurants may not reopen before June 8. (Photo by Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images)

When Luke Edwards opened OH Pizza & Brew in 2014, the Columbus, Ohio, restaurateur thought delivery apps could help his business. His chicken wings and specialty pizzas—the most popular and appropriately named “Bypass,” topped with pepperoni, sausage, ham, salami, bacon, and extra cheese—needed an audience. And he says working with apps such as DoorDash, Grubhub, Postmates, and Canada’s SkipTheDishes helped him build a loyal following, allowing him to open two more OH Pizza & Brews, with another location on the way.

But by January 2019, Edwards had had enough. For one, he didn’t think the services were helping his bottom line. “Even though we were bringing in more money, after paying out the commission rates, we were seeing a decrease in net profits,” he says. The drivers were inconsistent, he reports, and sometimes lacked equipment like insulated food bags to keep deliveries warm. Edwards also found it harder to get in touch with customer service reps for the apps, who would sometimes refund customers at the eatery’s expense for deliveries he believed had gone well.

“Quickly, I realized [the apps] were good at the search and optimization thing,” he adds. “They were terrible at delivery.” Today, OH Pizza & Brew pays its own contracted drivers to deliver, which Edwards believes saves him money.

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Source: Ars Technica – Everyone’s ordering delivery, but apps aren’t making money

Intel to Discontinue Core i9-9900K Special Dodecahedron Packaging

One of the interesting elements of this profession is dealing with how the processor companies have changed their attitudes towards marketing their products over the past couple of decades. After years of bland boxing and sub-standard coolers, there have been recent efforts to produce something eye-catching to users casually browsing shelves, especially in an effort to draw attention to the high-end products. While ultimately the packaging has little-to-no value after unboxing the product, beyond perhaps the background in a gaming stream, it does mark a change in attitudes, especially when product packaging can accelerate the hype around a product.


One of the recent product packaging efforts from Intel was the dodecahedral packaging for its halo desktop product, the Core i9-9900K. While AMD has focused special packaging for high-end desktop, Intel it seems prefers to point it into the desktop product line. This packaging is a transparent blue dodecahedron, with the CPU at the center. No cooler is bundled, and the packaging is large for the processor, but it certainly made it stand out.



Intel launched Comet Lake a couple of weeks ago, its 10th generation Core product, with the flagship i9-10900K sitting at the top of the stack. As the Core i9-9900K no longer sits in that top spot, Intel has decided to discontinue versions of the 9900K in its special packaging. Specifically, retailers have until June 26th to order these processor versions, and the last shipment will be on July 10th. This is a very quick discontinuance procedure, however the non-special retail version will still be available.


At some point in this market, we are going to get a product with iconic packaging. One could argue if the packaging makes the product interesting at all – given how users tend to focus on a specific processor for their build, is spending potentially slightly more for the fancy box ever justified? You may think that this news post is somewhat arbitrary, talking about packaging discontinuance, but it perhaps yields a bigger question in the processor market – does packaging matter? Or the contents – a message from the CEO on a special anniversary edition, or the signature on the heatspreader?



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Source: AnandTech – Intel to Discontinue Core i9-9900K Special Dodecahedron Packaging

Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro mini-review: A vast improvement

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Source: Ars Technica – Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro mini-review: A vast improvement

The Generic USB Display Driver Taking Shape For Linux 5.9~5.10

One of the interesting new happenings in the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver space is a Generic USB Display stack including a USB gadget driver that together allow for some interesting generic USB display setups. This work was motivated by being able to turn a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero into a USB to HDMI display adapter…

Source: Phoronix – The Generic USB Display Driver Taking Shape For Linux 5.9~5.10

How to Install VirtualBox on Ubuntu 20.04

VirtualBox is open-source cross-platform virtualization software that allows you to run multiple guest operating systems (virtual machines) simultaneously. Generally, Virtualbox is used by desktop users as a testing and development environment. In this tutorial, we will show you two ways to install VirtualBox on Ubuntu 20.04:

Source: LXer – How to Install VirtualBox on Ubuntu 20.04

Whoooaaa duuuuude: Why we stretch words in tweets and texts

Whoooaaa duuuuude: Why we stretch words in tweets and texts

Enlarge (credit: Paul Linse | Getty Images)

On Twitter, when a simple ha won’t do, there’s always hahahaaaa, haaaahaaaa, or even hahahahahahahahahahahahaha, indicating you’ve just read the funniest thing you’ve ever seen. (Or that you’re a sarcastic talking raccoon.) These are known as stretchable or lengthened words, and now researchers from the University of Vermont have figured out just how pervasive they are on Twitter, uncovering fascinating patterns about their use.

Stretchability is a powerful linguistic device that visually punches up a written word, imparting a wide range of emotions. That goes for the gooooooaaaaaaal of a soccer announcer, a teenager’s exasperated finallyyyyy, and a surfer’s aweeeeeesome. And booooyare they popular on Twitter. Writing today in the journal PLOS One, the researchers detail how they combed through 100 billion tweets, mapping how often these words are stretched, and how far they are elongated—haha versus hahahahaaaa, for example.

Consider dude and its many formulations. “That can convey basically anything, like ‘Duuuuude, that’s awful,’” says University of Vermont applied mathematician Peter Sheridan Dodds, one of the study’s coauthors. On the other hand, “Dude!” is different. “It could be excitement; it could be joy,” says Dodds.

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Source: Ars Technica – Whoooaaa duuuuude: Why we stretch words in tweets and texts