IT Pro Screwed Out of Unused Vacation Pay, Bonus By HPE Thanks To Outdated Law

Slashdot reader Meg Whitman shares a report from The Register: A “highly skilled IT professional” has lost his fight to be paid his unused vacation days as well as a non-trivial bonus, after a judge stuck to a law he admitted was outdated. Matthew White joined Hewlett-Packard in 2013 and left in July 2015, just months before the company split into HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE). After quitting, he was stunned when the U.S. mega-corp, citing HPE’s new policies, refused to hand over extra pay he felt was contractually due. Hewlett-Packard had enticed White with a sweet contract that offered a signing bonus, base salary, regular bonuses, and a benefits program. But after he quit, he was left without his unused vacation pay and a $10,000 bonus he felt he was entitled to. […]

HPE decided that, under the law, White could only get hold of the relevant policies if he turned up, in person, to the company’s official human resources headquarters — which is on the other side of America in California, roughly 2,500 miles away. White felt this was ridiculous given that HP, sorry, HPE is not only a massive organization with HR people all over the United States, but that it was a technology company with countless employees working across the world, often at home, and that the policies are likely readily available in an internal cloud. The judge had some sympathy for that view. “This part of the statute may indeed need reworking for today’s world where cloud-based digital records are replacing physical file folders located in a physical location, where employees work at home — sometimes remotely from any head office or regional office — and where worldwide companies like HP assign HP personnel for an entire country or region, or even outsource various HP responsibilities.” Yet the judge still decided against the techie.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – IT Pro Screwed Out of Unused Vacation Pay, Bonus By HPE Thanks To Outdated Law

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