An Anonymous Bitcoin Millionaire Is Donating Their Fortune to Charities and It Seems Legit

‘Tis the season for giving, and one Bitcoin investor claims to be giving away the majority of their cryptocurrency holdings after experiencing an incredible year. The unnamed donor has set up a fund to hand out $86 million worth of Bitcoin to various charities, and they’ve already started listing the donations and…

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Source: Gizmodo – An Anonymous Bitcoin Millionaire Is Donating Their Fortune to Charities and It Seems Legit

Google Chrome beta delivers mute tool for autoplay videos

Months ago, a blog post by the good developers of Chrome let its users know that come January, users would be free of audio from autoplaying videos. As far as we know, those upgrades is still on track to arrive in early 2018 for all users, but you ca…

Source: Engadget – Google Chrome beta delivers mute tool for autoplay videos

ISPs Won't Promise To Treat All Traffic Equally After Net Neutrality

An anonymous reader writes: The FCC voted to put an end to net neutrality, giving internet providers free rein to deliver service at their own discretion. There’s really only one condition here: internet providers will have to disclose their policies regarding “network management practices, performance, and commercial terms.” So if ISPs want to block websites, throttle your connection, or charge certain websites more, they’ll have to admit it. We’re still too far out to know exactly what disclosures all the big ISPs are going to make — the rules (or lack thereof) don’t actually go into effect for another few months — but many internet providers have been making statements throughout the year about their stance on net neutrality, which ought to give some idea of where they’ll land. We reached out to 10 big or notable ISPs to see what their stances are on three core tenets of net neutrality: no blocking, no throttling, and no paid prioritization. Not all of them answered, and the answers we did get are complicated. [The Verge reached out to Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, Charter (Spectrum), Cox, Altice USA (Optimum and SuddenLink), and Google Fi and Google Fiber.]

Many ISPs say they support some or all of these core rules, but there’s a big caveat there: for six of the past seven years, there have been net neutrality rules in place at the FCC. That means all of the companies we checked with have had to abide by the no blocking, no throttling, and no paid prioritization rules. It means that they can say, and be mostly correct in saying, that they’ve long followed those rules. But it is, on some level, because they’ve had to. What actually matters is which policies ISPs say they’ll keep in the future, and few are making commitments about that. In fact, all of the companies we contacted (with the exception of Google) have supported the FCC’s plan to remove the current net neutrality rules. None of the ISPs we contacted will make a commitment — or even a comment — on paid fast lanes and prioritization. And this is really where we expect to see problems: ISPs likely won’t go out and block large swaths of the web, but they may start to give subtle advantages to their own content and the content of their partners, slowly shaping who wins and loses online. Comcast: Comcast says it currently doesn’t block, throttle content, or offer paid fast lanes, but hasn’t committed to not doing so in the future. AT&T: AT&T has committed to not blocking or throttling websites in the future. However, its stance around fast lanes is unclear. Verizon: Verizon indicates that, at least in the immediate future, it will not block legal content. As for throttling and fast lanes, the company has no stance, and even seems to be excited to use the absence of rules to its advantage. T-Mobile: T-Mobile makes no commitments to not throttle content or offer paid fast lanes and is unclear on its commitment to not blocking sites and services. It’s already involved in programs that advantage some services over others. Sprint: Sprint makes no commitments on net neutrality, but suggests it doesn’t have plans to offer a service that would block sites. Charter (Spectrum): Charter doesn’t make any guarantees, but the company indicates that it’s currently committed to not blocking or throttling customers. Cox: Cox says it won’t block or throttle content, even without net neutrality. It won’t make commitments on zero-rating or paid fast lanes. Altice USA (Optimum and SuddenLink): Altice doesn’t currently block or throttle and suggests it will keep those policies, though without an explicit commitment. The company doesn’t comment on prioritizing one service over another. Google Fi and Google Fiber: Google doesn’t make any promises regarding throttling and paid prioritization. However, it is the only company to state that it believes paid prioritization would be harmful.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – ISPs Won’t Promise To Treat All Traffic Equally After Net Neutrality

Make Your Garbage Smell Pretty With Essential Oils

Your trash smells bad. If you get one of those airtight lidded cans, your trash only smells bad when you open it, releasing a wet rancid fog right into your face. The best fix is to separate your food waste and store it in the freezer. But unless you’re composting that food waste, that’s too much work. Instead—or…

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Source: LifeHacker – Make Your Garbage Smell Pretty With Essential Oils

Use Amazon Prime Now to Help Those in Need

You probably see it all the time: someone sitting alone out in the cold, holding a sign with a scribbled plea for help on it. Well, even if you don’t carry cash anymore, or have time to run to a nearby store, you might still be able to help them with this clever act of kindness.

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Source: LifeHacker – Use Amazon Prime Now to Help Those in Need

iTunes isn't coming to the Windows Store this year after all

iTunes for Windows users are going to be disappointed. Despite the promises of both Apple and Microsoft to bring the popular music and app software to the Microsoft Store this year, it appears as if we’ll all have to wait a little longer.

Source: Engadget – iTunes isn’t coming to the Windows Store this year after all

A Giant Buddha Temple In Thailand With A 17-Story Dragon Wrapped Around It

temple-of-the-rising-dragon.jpg

This is a short video highlighting the Wat Samphran Buddhist temple (aka The Temple Of The Rising Dragon’) in the Samphran district of Thailand. The hollow temple measures 80 meters tall (a reference to how long Buddha lived, ~263-feet) and has a giant 17-story dragon wrapped around the entire thing. You can even climb stairs to the top and pet the dragon’s beard or climb inside it. Now that is a pretty cool temple. For reference, my body is my temple, so it measures just over six feet tall, is significantly fatter around the middle, and entirely underwhelming in every way.

Keep going for the video.

Source: Geekologie – A Giant Buddha Temple In Thailand With A 17-Story Dragon Wrapped Around It

How to Secure Your Google Account with Yubikey

If you haven’t added a second layer of security to your Google account, you’re more vulnerable than you realize. You might think you’re secure if you’re using SMS to protect your accounts, but even that has its own security issues compared to alternative verification options. You could employ an authentication app,…

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Source: LifeHacker – How to Secure Your Google Account with Yubikey

NVIDIA Titan V Benchmarks Show Volta GPU Compute, Mining and Gaming Strength

MojoKid shares a report from Hot Hardware: Although NVIDIA officially unveiled its Volta-based GV100 GPU a few months ago, the NVIDIA TITAN V featuring the GV100 began shipping just this past week. The card targets a very specific audience and is designed for professional and academic deep learning applications, which partly explains its lofty $3,000 price tag. Unlike NVIDIA’s previous-gen consumer flagship, the TITAN Xp, the TITAN V is not designed for gamers. However, since it features NVIDIA’s latest GPU architecture, it potentially foreshadows next-year’s consumer-targeted GeForce cards that could possibly be based on Volta. The massive 21.1 billion transistor GV100 GPU powering the TITAN V has a base clock of 1,200MHz and a boost clock of 1,455MHz. The card has 12GB of HBM2 memory on-board that is linked to the GPU via a 3072-bit interface, offering up 652.8 GB/s of peak bandwidth, which is about 100GB/s more than a TITAN Xp. Other features of the GV100 include 5,120 single-precision CUDA cores, 2,560 double-precision FP64 cores, and 630 Tensor cores. Although the card is not designed for gamers, the fact remains that the TITAN V significantly outpaces every other graphics card in a variety of games with the highest image quality settings. In GPU compute workloads, the TITAN V is much more dominant and can offer many times the performance of a high-end NVIDIA TITAN Xp or AMD Radeon RX Vega 64. Finally, when it comes to Ethereum mining, NVIDIA’s Titan V is far and away the fastest GPU on the planet currently.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – NVIDIA Titan V Benchmarks Show Volta GPU Compute, Mining and Gaming Strength

Google Maps will now tell you when to get off the bus or train

A mass transit feature for the Android version of Google Maps that notifies you when you need to get off the bus is finally live. It also includes step-by-step navigation, departure times and ETAs for your next public transportation ride. You can als…

Source: Engadget – Google Maps will now tell you when to get off the bus or train

Dealmaster: Get a 15-inch Dell laptop with a Core i7 for $580

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share. While the Dealmaster hopes you haven’t left all your holiday shopping until now, we do have a few solid bargains for those who haven’t gotten started yet. Dell is running a number of sales on its line of Inspiron and XPS laptops, for one, while the rest of the list includes sales on quality gadgets like the PlayStation 4 Pro, Sonos Play:1, Bose QuietComfort 25, Amazon Echo Dot, and Amazon Kindle Paperwhite among others. You can take a look at the full rundown below.

Note: Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs.

Featured Deals

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Source: Ars Technica – Dealmaster: Get a 15-inch Dell laptop with a Core i7 for 0

Why the Law Doesn't (and Sometimes Shouldn't) Protect Us From the Algorithms That Rule Our Lives

Most people are aware that algorithms control what you see on Facebook or Google, but automated decision-making is increasingly being used to determine real-life outcomes as well, influencing everything from how fire departments prevent fires to how police departments prevent crime. Given how much these (often…

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Source: Gizmodo – Why the Law Doesn’t (and Sometimes Shouldn’t) Protect Us From the Algorithms That Rule Our Lives

ISS astronauts will get their own Star Wars premiere—in space

Enlarge / In space, no one can hear you stream. Because the latency would kill you. (credit: NASA)

When you’re orbiting 400 kilometers above the Earth, getting to the movie-plex to watch the latest science fiction blockbuster is a bit of a drag. But the current crew of the International Space Station will still be able to watch Star Wars: The Last Jedi, according to a report from Inverse—and they’ll do so while in orbit.

NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot told Inverse that the ISS crew “will be able to watch it in orbit. Don’t have a definitive timeline yet.”

This is at least partially thanks to the improvements made in the ISS’ communications systems in 2013. Those updates were intended to improve the “scientific output” of the space station, which once had to essentially rely on dial-up speed connections. The High Rate Communications System (HRCS) gave the ISS a massive upgrade in its downlink and uplink speeds—increasing the bandwidth of uplink from the ground to 25 megabits per second, making it qualify as broadband under FCC guidelines. The downlink speeds—the rate at which ISS can send data to ground stations—is a blazing 300 megabits per second. The high-speed networking gear and accompanying Ethernet upgrades were executed by the ISS’ commander at the time, Canadian astronaut and interstellar rock star Chris Hadfield, and Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn.

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Source: Ars Technica – ISS astronauts will get their own Star Wars premiere—in space

How to Set Up Smart Lighting and Wireless Security Cameras

It’s time to upgrade your simple home into a smart home, people! It’s way easier to do than you think. We’re continuing our Homehackers video series by going over smart lighting, smart switches, and wireless security cameras.

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Source: LifeHacker – How to Set Up Smart Lighting and Wireless Security Cameras

Apple Music's next exclusives come from Noel Gallagher and Sam Smith

Apple isn’t slowing down on exclusives any time soon. It’s releasing Apple Music-only concert films from two British superstars, Noel Gallagher and Sam Smith. Gallagher’s Who Built the Moon Live recaptures an early November gig at London’s York Hal…

Source: Engadget – Apple Music’s next exclusives come from Noel Gallagher and Sam Smith

New discovery pushes star Kepler-90’s menagerie to eight planets

Enlarge / That’s a lot of mouths to feed. (credit: NASA/Wendy Stenzel)

If you have an emotional attachment to our Solar System’s distinctions, you may want to look away. We’ve found another star system with eight planets, tying our own mark. Oh, and a Google machine-learning algorithm is responsible for the discovery.

This is one of two new exoplanets scraped from the massive archive of data from the Kepler space telescope by NASA’s Andrew Vanderburg and Christopher Shallue of the Google AI team. Planets detected by Kepler show up as slight dips in the brightness of a star—the result of the planet passing in front and blocking some of the light. Some planets are more obvious than others, and the goal here was to turn the algorithm loose on digging through past measurements for weak signals that had been missed.

Like all machine learning systems, this one was fed measurements from previously identified exoplanets to work out what differentiates real signals from coincidental blips. The researchers say the system emerged with the ability to correctly identify false positives about 96 percent of the time.

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Source: Ars Technica – New discovery pushes star Kepler-90’s menagerie to eight planets