FP64 Support Revised For R600g Gallium3D Driver

While the Radeon HD 5000/6000 series were advertised as supporting up to OpenGL 4.4 and are supported that way by the Catalyst / Radeon Software proprietary driver, the Mesa R600g driver has only exposed OpenGL 3.3 (with the exception of the HD 5800 / 6900 series) due to lacking FP64 support. That emulated FP64 support is now stepping ahead for the R600g driver…

Source: Phoronix – FP64 Support Revised For R600g Gallium3D Driver

The DRM Changes To Find With The Linux 4.14 Kernel

With the Linux 4.13-rc6 kernel now being out for a few days, we’re now past the timeframe for which DRM subsystem maintainer David Airlie allows new feature code to be staged in DRM-Next. Thus we have a pretty solid look at the highlights of the new Direct Rendering Manager features/changes coming for the Linux 4.14 kernel…

Source: Phoronix – The DRM Changes To Find With The Linux 4.14 Kernel

Inputfd Still Being Worked On For Direct Input Access Under Wayland

It has been several months since last hearing anything about inputfd, the proposed direct input access protocol for Wayland. This protocol extension would make it to be able to better support different gaming devices under Wayland, among other use-cases…

Source: Phoronix – Inputfd Still Being Worked On For Direct Input Access Under Wayland

Mozilla's Push For Super Fast CSS With Quantum/Stylo

Since the end of July Stylo has been available via Firefox Nightly as the Rust-written Servo CSS style system. For those curious about this modern CSS system and the broader effort as part of bringing Servo/Quantum components to Firefox, Mozilla has out an interesting blog post…

Source: Phoronix – Mozilla’s Push For Super Fast CSS With Quantum/Stylo

ASRock AB350 Pro4: A Decent, Linux-Friendly Ryzen Motherboard For As Low As $69 USD

Two weeks back I picked up the ASRock AB350 Pro4 for a low-end AMD Ryzen motherboard for use with some of the Ryzen 3 CPUs and it’s been working out well for those wanting a Ryzen Linux system and not looking to spend much money. With it working out well for my purposes and currently being on sale, I figured I’d pass along this quick recommendation for those wanting to assemble a budget Ryzen Linux system.

Source: Phoronix – ASRock AB350 Pro4: A Decent, Linux-Friendly Ryzen Motherboard For As Low As USD

Mod your Nerf gun with a Pi

Michael Darby, who blogs at 314reactor, has created a new Raspberry Pi build, and it’s pretty darn cool. Though it’s not the first Raspberry Pi-modded Nerf gun we’ve seen, it’s definitely one of the most complex!

Nerf Gun Ammo Counter / Range Finder – Raspberry Pi

An ammo counter and range finder made from a Raspberry Pi for a Nerf Gun.

Nerf guns

Nerf guns are toy dart guns that have been on the market since the early 1990s. They are popular with kids and adults who enjoy playing paintball, laser tag, and first-person shooter video games. Michael loves Nerf guns, and he wanted to give his toy a sci-fi overhaul, making it look and function more like a gun that an avatar might use in Half-Life, Quake, or Doom.

Modding a Nerf gun

A busy and creative member of the Raspberry Pi community, Michael has previously delighted us with his Windows 98 wristwatch. Now, he has upgraded his Nerf gun with a rangefinder and an ammo counter by adding a Pi, a Pimoroni Rainbow HAT, and some sensors.

Setting up a rangefinder was straightforward. Michael fixed an ultrasonic distance sensor pointing in the direction of the gun’s barrel. Live information about how far away he is from his target is shown on the Rainbow HAT’s alphanumeric display.

View of Michael Darby's nerf gun range finder

To create an ammo counter, Michael had to follow a more circuitous route. Since he couldn’t think of a way to read out how many darts are in the Nerf gun’s magazine, he ended up counting how many darts have been shot instead. This data is collected via a proximity sensor, a device that can measure shorter distances than an ultrasonic sensor. Michael aimed the sensor towards the end of the barrel, attaching it with Blu-Tack.

View of Michael Darby's nerf gun proximity sensor

The number of shots left in the magazine is indicated by the seven LEDs above the Rainbow HAT’s alphanumeric display. The countdown works for more than seven darts, thanks to colour coding: the LEDs count down first in red, then in orange, and finally in green.

In a Python script running on the Pi, Michael has included a default number of shots per magazine. When he changes a magazine, he uses one of the HAT’s buttons as a ‘Reload’ button, resetting the counter. He has also set up the HAT so that the number of available shots can be entered manually instead.

Nerf gun modding tutorial

On Michael’s blog you will find a thorough step-by-step guide to how he created this build. He has also included his code, and links to all the components, software installation guides, and test scripts he has used. So head on over there if you’re keen to mod your own nerf gun like this, and take a look at some of his other projects while you’re there!

Michael welcomes suggestions for how to improve upon his mods, especially for how to count shots in a magazine automatically. Do you have an idea? Let usand himknow in the comments!

Toy mods

Over the years, we’ve covered quite a few fun toy upgrades, and some that may have to be approached with caution. The Pi-powered busy board for babies, the ‘weaponized’ teddy bear, and the inevitable smart Fisher Price phone are just a few from our archives.

What’s your favourite childhood toy, and how could it be improved by the addition of a Pi? Share your ideas with us in the comments below.

The post Mod your Nerf gun with a Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – Mod your Nerf gun with a Pi

The Passive Cooling Paradigm: Atlast Solutions Ultimate Fanless Core i7 7700T

For your Linux hardware interest this evening is a reader-contributed guest review of the Atlast Solutions Ultimate Fanless Core i7 7700T under Linux. Thanks to Luuk van der Duim for testing this fanless computer and sharing his results with us at Phoronix. Reader opinion pieces, Linux hardware reviews, and other article are happily accepted by contacting us…

Source: Phoronix – The Passive Cooling Paradigm: Atlast Solutions Ultimate Fanless Core i7 7700T