Google Shopping is becoming a lot like browsing on Amazon

Google Shopping is getting some new tricks ahead of the busiest retail season of the year. Specifically, when you’re looking for a coffee grinder or pair of headphones, now Google will populate search results with buying guides from editorial publica…

Source: Engadget – Google Shopping is becoming a lot like browsing on Amazon

How the Sugar Industry Tried To Hide Health Effects of Its Product 50 Years Ago

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: About 50 years ago, the sugar industry stopped funding research that began to show something they wanted to hide: that eating lots of sugar is linked to heart disease. A new study exposes the sugar industry’s decades-old effort to stifle that critical research. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, recently analyzed historical documents regarding a rat study called Project 259 that was launched in 1968. The study was funded by a sugar industry trade group called the International Sugar Research Foundation, or ISRF, and conducted by W. F. R. Pover at the University of Birmingham. When the preliminary findings from that study began to show that eating lots of sugar might be associated with heart disease, and even bladder cancer, the ISRF pulled the plug on the research. Without additional funding, the study was terminated and the results were never published, according to a study published today in PLOS Biology. The study in question investigated the relationship between sugars and certain blood fats called triglycerides, which increase the risk of heart disease. The preliminary results from the research, called Project 259, suggested that rats on a high-sugar diet, instead of a starch diet, had higher levels of triglycerides. The rats that ate lots of sugar also had higher levels of an enzyme called beta-glucuronidase in their urine, which at the time was thought to be potentially linked to bladder cancer, says study co-author Cristin Kearns, an assistant professor at the UCSF School of Dentistry.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – How the Sugar Industry Tried To Hide Health Effects of Its Product 50 Years Ago

Julian Assange Tries to Save Net Neutrality With Rambling Appeal to Trump's Paranoia

Julian Assange—whose organization Wikileaks’ sad, thirsty Twitter DMs to Donald Trump Jr. recently leaked, revealing he sought to coordinate with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign—appears to have had a moment of buyer’s regret on Tuesday evening.

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Source: Gizmodo – Julian Assange Tries to Save Net Neutrality With Rambling Appeal to Trump’s Paranoia

Sony Now Offering Black Friday Discounts on PlayStation Gear

Posted: 11-21-2017 10:07 PM
Source: https://www.psxhax.com/threads/sony-…ion-gear.3102/
Summary:

Whether it’s PlayStation-branded shirts, jackets or coffee mugs Sony has it covered this holiday season offering Black Friday discounts starting today on PlayStation Gear at the official site…

Sony Now Offering Black Friday Discounts on PlayStation Gear



Source: PS4 News – Sony Now Offering Black Friday Discounts on PlayStation Gear

Dark streaks on Mars may not be caused by flowing water

In 2015, scientists analyzing mysterious dark streaks on the surface of Mars found evidence that they were formed by liquid water — an exciting discovery that meant microbial life might be supported on the planet. But new findings published this wee…

Source: Engadget – Dark streaks on Mars may not be caused by flowing water

FTC may investigate TripAdvisor over deleted posts, but it isn't yet

Earlier this month, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that TripAdvisor had deleted multiple posts from users warning others about incidents of assault and rape that had taken place at a certain resorts in Mexico. Since then, the journal says th…

Source: Engadget – FTC may investigate TripAdvisor over deleted posts, but it isn’t yet

$31 Million In Tokens Stolen From Dollar-Pegged Cryptocurrency Tether

Mark Wilson shares a report from BetaNews: All eyes may be on the meteoric rise of Bitcoin at the moment, but it’s far from being the only cryptocurrency on the block. Startup Tether issued a critical announcement after it was discovered that “malicious action by an external attacker” had led to the theft of nearly $31 million worth of tokens. Tether is a dollar-pegged cryptocurrency formerly known as Realcoin, and it says that $30,950,010 was stolen from a treasury wallet. The company says it is doing what it can to ensure exchanges do not process these tokens, including temporarily suspending its backend wallet service. Tether knows the address used by the attacker to make the theft, but is not aware of either who the attacker is, or how the attack took place. The company is releasing a new version of its Omni Core software client in what it says is “effectively a temporary hard fork to the Omni Layer.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Million In Tokens Stolen From Dollar-Pegged Cryptocurrency Tether

Apple buys the creator of a 'seamless' mixed reality headset

Those rumors of Apple making an augmented reality headset just got a little more fuel. TechCrunch sources say that Apple has acquired VRvana, a startup that crowdfunded (but hasn’t shipped) a unique camera-based AR and VR headset, the Totem. Unlike…

Source: Engadget – Apple buys the creator of a ‘seamless’ mixed reality headset

Belgian Gaming Commission Decides Battlefront II-Style Loot Boxes Are Gambling, Wants Them Banned

Electronic Art’s Star Wars Battlefront II, one of the biggest video game titles of the year, debuted to disaster in recent weeks after both consumers and the gaming press revolted against the $60 game’s reliance on microtransaction-fueled, pay-to-win loot boxes. At launch, the title prevented players from accessing…

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Source: Gizmodo – Belgian Gaming Commission Decides Battlefront II-Style Loot Boxes Are Gambling, Wants Them Banned

Ask Slashdot: How Are So Many Security Vulnerabilities Possible?

dryriver writes: It seems like not a day goes by on Slashdot and elsewhere on the intertubes that you don’t read a story headline reading “Company_Name Product_Name Has Critical Vulnerability That Allows Hackers To Description_Of_Bad_Things_Vulnerability_Allows_To_Happen.” A lot of it is big brand products as well. How, in the 21st century, is this possible, and with such frequency? Is software running on electronic hardware invariably open to hacking if someone just tries long and hard enough? Or are the product manufacturers simply careless or cutting corners in their product designs? If you create something that communicates with other things electronically, is there no way at all to ensure that the device is practically unhackable?

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Source: Slashdot – Ask Slashdot: How Are So Many Security Vulnerabilities Possible?

PC vendors scramble as Intel announces vulnerability in firmware

Enlarge / All the Cores are affected by a major vulnerability in management firmware—as are Xeon servers and Atom, Celeron and Pentium devices. (credit: Intel)

Intel has issued a security alert that management firmware on a number of recent PC, server, and Internet-of-Things processor platforms is vulnerable to remote attack. Using the vulnerabilities, the most severe of which was uncovered by Mark Ermolov and Maxim Goryachy of Positive Technologies Research, remote attackers could launch commands on a host of Intel-based computers, including laptops and desktops shipped with Intel Core processors since 2015. They could gain access to privileged system information, and millions of computers could essentially be taken over as a result of the bug.

The company has posted a detection tool on its support website for Windows and Linux to help identify systems that are vulnerable. In the security alert, members of Intel’s security team stated that “in response to issues identified by external researchers, Intel has performed an in-depth comprehensive security review of its Intel® Management Engine (ME), Intel® Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Intel® Server Platform Services (SPS) with the objective of enhancing firmware resilience.”

Four vulnerabilities were discovered that affect Intel Management Engine firmware versions 11.0 through 11.20. Two were found in earlier versions of ME, as well as two in Server Platform Services version 4.0 firmware and two in TXE version 3.0.

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Source: Ars Technica – PC vendors scramble as Intel announces vulnerability in firmware

Before Peter Thiel invested, research on herpes vaccine began in US hotel rooms

(credit: ZaldyImg)

The researcher who conducted a controversial 2016 herpes vaccine trial on the island of St. Kitts without federal safety oversight had secretly begun the trial in the US three years earlier. He began them in hotel rooms not far from his academic lab. That’s according to a new investigation by Kaiser Health News.

That researcher, the late Dr. William Halford of Southern Illinois University, administered shots to at least eight people with herpes in 2013. Without any federal or institutional approval or oversight, he administered the shots himself in rooms at a Holiday Inn Express and a Crowne Plaza Hotel within a short drive from SIU. Halford, who passed away from cancer in June of this year, was a microbiologist, not a physician.

Several people who received the vaccine have since complained to the FDA and SIU. They reported potential side effects of the vaccine including large, painful rashes and becoming infected with a strain of herpes different from their initial infection.

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Source: Ars Technica – Before Peter Thiel invested, research on herpes vaccine began in US hotel rooms

Belgium Hates Loot Boxes

I think this whole loot box issue is just getting spun up. Outside of gamer outrage about loot boxes, now the Minister of Justice in Belgium is saying that loot boxes are nothing more than gambling and he does not want Belgium’s children exposed to it. Take your translator. Thanks cageymaru!

Minister of Justice wants to prohibit purchases in video games, if you do not know what you exactly mean with that purchase. “Mixing gambling and gaming, especially at a young age, is dangerous for the mental health of the child.”

Are loot boxes gambling? There are some good arguments for and against.



And I just missed out on the last Bag-O-Crap.

Discussion

Source: [H]ardOCP – Belgium Hates Loot Boxes

Sacramento Regional Transit Systems Hit By Hacker

Zorro shares a report from CBS Local: Sacramento Regional Transit is the one being taken for a ride on this night, by a computer hacker. That hacker forced RT to halt its operating systems that take credit card payments, and assigns buses and trains to their routes. The local transit agency alerted federal agents following an attack on their computers that riders may not have noticed Monday. “We actually had the hackers get into our system, and systematically start erasing programs and data,” Deputy General Manager Mark Lonergan. Inside RT’s headquarters, computer systems were taken down after the hacker deleted 30 million files. The hacker also demanded a ransom in bitcoin, and left a message on the RT website reading “I’m sorry to modify the home page, I’m good hacker, I just want to help you fix these vulnerability.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Sacramento Regional Transit Systems Hit By Hacker

Uber Tells Us Customer Data got Hacked….Last Year

I think we all call BS on Uber waiting a year to let us know its systems were hacked and personal data was exposed.

The ride-hailing company said Tuesday that it had suffered a breach in 2016 that exposed personal information belonging to tens of millions of drivers and customers.

The information included names, email addresses and phone numbers of 57 million people around the world, according to a statement released by the company’s CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi. The names and driver’s license numbers of about 600,000 U.S. drivers were also included.



And then Uber figured it out after a month and paid hackers $100,00 to keep it under wraps. Jeez. Thanks cageymaru.

Travis Kalanick, Uber’s co-founder and former CEO, became aware of the breach a month after it occurred, according to Bloomberg. Instead of reporting the attack to regulators and victims last year, the company paid hackers $100,000 to delete the data and keep the security breach under wraps, Bloomberg reported.

Discussion

Source: [H]ardOCP – Uber Tells Us Customer Data got Hacked….Last Year

FCC Will Also Order States To Scrap Plans For Their Own Net Neutrality Laws

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In addition to ditching its own net neutrality rules, the Federal Communications Commission also plans to tell state and local governments that they cannot impose local laws regulating broadband service. This detail was revealed by senior FCC officials in a phone briefing with reporters today, and it is a victory for broadband providers that asked for widespread preemption of state laws. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposed order finds that state and local laws must be preempted if they conflict with the U.S. government’s policy of deregulating broadband Internet service, FCC officials said. The FCC will vote on the order at its December 14 meeting. It isn’t clear yet exactly how extensive the preemption will be. Preemption would clearly prevent states from imposing net neutrality laws similar to the ones being repealed by the FCC, but it could also prevent state laws related to the privacy of Internet users or other consumer protections. Pai’s staff said that states and other localities do not have jurisdiction over broadband because it is an interstate service and that it would subvert federal policy for states and localities to impose their own rules.

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Source: Slashdot – FCC Will Also Order States To Scrap Plans For Their Own Net Neutrality Laws

First observed interstellar object is a speedy, cigar-shaped asteroid

Last month, astronomers running the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii spotted an intriguing object moving through our solar system and it became clear pretty quickly that the object, whether it was a comet or an asteroid, had come from outside of our…

Source: Engadget – First observed interstellar object is a speedy, cigar-shaped asteroid